Never Messed With: Unrestored 1969 Rupp Goat

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This 1969 Rupp Goat was produced by an Ohio-based manufacturer of mini bikes, small dune buggiessnowmobiles, and go-karts that operated from 1959 until 1978. The Goat was a midrange model produced for just a single year in the midst of Rupp’s ever-changing lineup, and is powered by a 5 hp Tecumseh four-stroke single. This one is claimed to remain in largely original condition (a real rarity) with 90 miles displayed on the odometer, and we think it’d make the perfect accessory to put in the back of an old International Scout. Find it here on eBay in Miami, Florida for $2,500 OBO.

Never Messed With: Unrestored 1969 Rupp Goat

The Goat slotted between Rupp’s range-topping Roadster and Scrambler, and all three came exclusively in red, orange, yellow, or the bright green metallic seen on this example. An expected number of small paint nicks and scuffs are present around the frame along with some surface rust on the brightwork and various hardware, but overall the little bike does look highly original and pretty well cared for all in all.

Never Messed With: Unrestored 1969 Rupp Goat

Features include coil spring shocks front and rear, a single drum brake out back, a double crown fork, full coverage fenders, a kickstand, and a cool ducktail seat–head and taillights were not offered for this model. We dig the solid wheels and knobbly tires too.

Never Messed With: Unrestored 1969 Rupp Goat

The cockpit is straightforward–a single hand lever actuates the rear drum brake, a twist-grip operates the throttle, and a speedometer/odometer is mounted atop the fork crown. Seat vinyl shows some aging along with a couple popped seams and the neat polished triangular fuel tank could be cleaned up a bit, but things look good enough that we’d be happy riding it around the pits just as it is.

Never Messed With: Unrestored 1969 Rupp Goat

The Tecumseh H50 four-stroke single mounted between the frame rails was good for about 5 horsepower when new, starts via pull-cord on the right-hand side, and turns the chain-driven rear wheel through a 2-speed jackshaft.

No Reserve: 1977 Honda CB750A Hondamatic

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This 1977 Honda CB750A is powered by a 736cc inline-four paired with a 2-speed Hondamatic semi-automatic transmission. The seller reports that the previous owner acquired the bike about four years ago as a project. During his ownership, the previous owner converted the bike to electronic ignition, fitted new oil passage seals, a head gasket, final drive chain, performed a valve adjustment, and more detailed below. The selling dealer fitted new Avon tires and a new turn signal relay. This CB750A is offered by the selling dealer with a factory tool roll, owner’s manual, kick-start handle, two keys, and a clean Wisconsin title.

No Reserve: 1977 Honda CB750A Hondamatic

The bike is finished in Candy Alpha Red, one of two reds available for 1977, and features gold pinstriping and badges. The selling dealer installed a pair of Avon Roadracer tires, and the previous owner fitted a quartz halogen headlight bulb and a set of aftermarket mufflers. Factory turn signals and lamps have been retained. The seller notes that the information sticker on the rear fender is peeling.

No Reserve: 1977 Honda CB750A Hondamatic

A diamond-pleated tandem seat is fitted and carries the Honda name in gold across the rear of the seat. A set of aftermarket bars finished in black are fitted, and the bike retains factory-style mirrors.

No Reserve: 1977 Honda CB750A Hondamatic

Instrumentation includes a 130-mph speedometer and a combination gauge housing the transmission indicator, fuel gauge, and warning lights. A new turn signal relay was installed by the selling dealer. Just under 12k miles are shown on the 5-digit odometer, approximately 50 of which were added by the selling dealer.

No Reserve: 1977 Honda CB750A Hondamatic

The 736cc inline-four was factory-rated at 47 horsepower and 36 lb-ft of torque, and sends power rearward via a 2-speed semi-automatic transmission. The Hondamatic transmission is equipped with a torque converter, and the two ratios are selected by the rider using a foot pedal. The seller reports that the previous owner performed the following work:

  • Cylinder head decked, new head gasket fitted
    • Photos of this service are provided in the gallery below
  • New oil passage o-rings
  • New shift-shaft oil seal
  • New final drive chain
  • New battery
  • New air filter
  • Cam chain and tensioner inspecction
  • Brake fluid flush
  • Dyna S Electronic ignition conversion with new plugs and Accel Super coils
  • Carburetors cleaned, re-sealed, and synchronized
  • Valve adjustment

No Reserve: 1977 Honda CB750A Hondamatic

A factory owner’s manual, tool roll, removable kick-start lever, and two keys are included. A walk-around video is viewable below.

Black-Plate 1959 BMW R60

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This 1959 BMW R60 was acquired by the current owner last year out of San Francisco and is powered by a 594cc boxer-twin paired with a 4-speed transmission. The bike is equipped with a sprung Denfeld solo seat, factory instrumentation, headlight-mounted mirrors, and a black California license plate. Work under current ownership included replacement of the throttle cables and hoses, as well as an oil change. This R60 is now offered on behalf of the current owner with a clean California title.

Black-Plate 1959 BMW R60

The black finish is accented by white pinstriping, and the seller notes chips that expose underlying primer along with corrosion where the finish has worn through. The bike is equipped with a Denfeld solo seat, though the seller believes the bike might have been previously fitted with either a pillion or a tandem seat. A California black plate is fitted out back.

Black-Plate 1959 BMW R60

The rims are laced to 200mm drum brakes and are fitted with older tires. An Earles fork is equipped up front, and the bike features oil filled dampers front and rear.

Black-Plate 1959 BMW R60

Instrumentation consists of a single gauge housing the speedometer and odometer, with the neutral indicator light mounted below. 11k miles are shown, though the true total is unknown. The seller notes that the keys for the steering lock and tool kit are missing.

Black-Plate 1959 BMW R60

The 594cc boxer twin was rated at 30 horsepower from the factory, which is sent to the rear wheel via a 4-speed transmission and shaft drive. The current owner has replaced the throttle cables, some hoses, changed the oil, and performed other general tune-up work. A cold-start and walk-around video is viewable below.

One-Owner 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore

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This 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore was purchased new by the seller at Pro Italia in Glendale, California and now shows just over 4k miles. Powered a 1098cc L-twin paired with a 6-speed transmission, the bike features a computerized data acquisition system, Öhlins adjustable suspension, Marchesini wheels, and a Termignoni exhaust with carbon fiber silencers. A Yoyodyne slipper clutch has been added, and both tires and the battery were recently replaced. This Tricolore is now offered with a stock 1098 exhaust system, removed parts, the factory keys and manuals, and a clean California title in the seller’s name.

One-Owner 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore

The limited edition 1098S Tricolore was finished from the factory in the red, white, and green of the Italian flag and features a gold trellis frame and wheels. This example has been fitted with Pro Italia rear sets, a SpeedyMoto upper triple clamp, CRG levers, a Tail Tidy license plate mount, and several carbon fiber accessories. The battery was recently replaced, and the Marchesini 17″ cast alloy wheels wear new Dunlop Q3 tires.

One-Owner 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore

The suspension consists of Öhlins 43mm upside-down forks and an adjustable Öhlins 46PRC shock on the rear. The front brakes are 330mm discs with Brembo monoblock calipers, and the Termignoni exhaust features carbon fiber silencers.

One-Owner 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore

Digital instrumentation features the Ducati Data Analyzer system, which enables review of data collected from a previous trip or track session on a personal computer. The digital odometer shows under 4,200 miles.

One-Owner 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore

The 1098cc L-twin features 4-valve, desmodromic heads and was rated at 160 horsepower in stock form. Power is transmitted to the rear wheel via a 6-speed transmission and a chain drive running through a cast single-sided swingarm.

One-Owner 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore

The aftermarket Yoyodyne slipper clutch is fitted with a vented carbon fiber cover. The seller notes that the oil was changed three months ago.

One-Owner 2007 Ducati 1098 S Tricolore

A stock 1098 exhaust system is included along with the removed components. The factory keys and manuals are pictured in the gallery.

Ur-Motocompo: 1962 Centaur FS4

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This 1962 Centaur FS4 (chassis 122211) is one of a few thousand built, one of which has already been featured on BaT. These 50cc two-stroke single/centrifugal clutch scooters weighed ~90 lbs., and can be folded into a portable package roughly the size of a large suitcase. Designed by Lambretta‘s US importer James Poster, these neat little scooters were marketed to boat and small aircraft owners, and with a respectable 40 mph top speed they sold surprisingly well over a five-year production run that ended in 1965. This one sounds to be unrestored, and the seller says it runs and operates well following a recent service. Find it here on eBay in Stanton, California for $4,490 OBO.

Ur-Motocompo: 1962 Centaur FS4

It seems most Centaurs were originally painted white, red, or green/blue as seen here, with a couple of different seat color options as well. Handlebar controls consist of a twist-grip throttle on the right and a lever for the single brake on the left.

Ur-Motocompo: 1962 Centaur FS4

In addition to the rear luggage rack, a matched set of soft-sided saddlebags were a factory option, but don’t appear to be included here. The pull cord handle used to start the bike can be seen above the swing-out foot peg on the right side.

Ur-Motocompo: 1962 Centaur FS4

This photo shows the scooter in all folded up, roughly the size of a large suitcase. Folding or unfolding was described in period ads an easy three-step process accomplished in about a minute thanks in part to a detachable front wheel–there’s also a sealable fuel vent that allowed the bike to be stowed in any position without worry of leaks.

Ur-Motocompo: 1962 Centaur FS4

The ad doesn’t include any direct shots of the Clinton two-stroke single, a 50cc unit that was good for about 5 horsepower when new and managed to return nearly 100 mpg. A top speed of 40 mph was reportedly attainable while the bike’s carrying capacity was an impressive 400 pounds.

Ur-Motocompo: 1962 Centaur FS4

This period ad showcases the Centaur’s folding process. Put in in the back of a Studebaker Wagonaire and park it next to a Honda City Turbo/Motocompo combo and win a billion internet points.

Sub-Cub Motorwheeler: Rare 1967 Honda P50

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This 1967 Honda P50 is small, rare and interesting, marking the last time the company built a motorwheel setup where the drivetrain is housed entirely within the rear wheel’s hub–it’s not a two-stroke either, but a 49cc unit with a tiny overhead cam actuating two diminutive valves. The seller has owned it for five years during which time they’ve done a top end rebuild, fitted custom-made replacement O-rings to the carb and installed what sounds like an NOS exhaust. Overall condition looks quite good, and sale includes a full factory tool kit, dealer assembly, owner’s, parts and service manuals. According to the ad it starts easily, runs very well and will do an RPM-limited 26 mph flat-out. Find it here on eBay in Superior, Wisconsin with reserve not met. Special thanks to BaT reader Markee for this submission.

Sub-Cub Motorwheeler: Rare 1967 Honda P50

Apparently the entire bike, fully-equipped and ready to ride weighs only 99 pounds–good thing as the little OHC single makes just 1.2 hp. Reads the ad: “This is actually a rare bike. It is NOT the USA Spec Model but the Export Model as identified by the ‘E’ in the Frame Serial Number. It also has the Non US Taillight and headlight assembly to also identify it as such. To add to its rarity is the unique light green factory color. Most were blue or red. Another rare option on this very unique bike is the full working turn signal option.” Luxury!

Sub-Cub Motorwheeler: Rare 1967 Honda P50

As the seller notes, this is more of a moped than a bike–note the pedals for starting. It’s a neat looking little thing, and would probably be a lot of fun to buzz around neighborhood streets with. The seller has it registered as a vintage motorcycle on a collector’s plate. Brakes are big–by bicycle standards, and controls are very simple thanks in large part to the simple fixed-gear/slipper clutch transmission built into the rear wheel hub in-unit with the engine.

Sub-Cub Motorwheeler: Rare 1967 Honda P50

There’s a speedometer but no odometer, and the seller admits they have no idea what true mileage is. These things were bought cheap, used up and thrown away, and though they sold in fairly big numbers in Asia and Europe, survivors are now rare. This one shows just enough patina to be charming, but overall remains in what looks like very nice shape.

Sub-Cub Motorwheeler: Rare 1967 Honda P50

Soichiro Honda strongly disliked two-strokes, and it’s not uncommon even today to find sub-100cc Honda motors with overhead cams–half a century ago the setup would have been especially novel. Again, from the ad: “There are a lot of new items installed on this bike. A full new exhaust system (It looks cracked in the pictures but is not) is just the starting point. I had O-rings made to fit the carb. You get a full extra set with it. These were not available in any way. It runs perfectly and starts very easy. Top speed is 26 mph. I did a quick top end overhaul on the bike. All that was required was to clean the seats and valves.”

Sub-Cub Motorwheeler: Rare 1967 Honda P50
Sub-Cub Motorwheeler: Rare 1967 Honda P50

Once more from the ad: “It comes with a ton of hard to find vintage paperwork all organized in a binder for you. The paperwork includes an owners manual, service manual, parts manual (US and Export), dealer assembly manual and more cool items. The complete tool kit is there also.”

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

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This 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto is said to have recently arrived from Italy, where it was restored to “concours standards” by a marque specialist. These are interesting bikes, combining characteristics of step-through scooters and more traditional motorcycles, and were designed to provide economical, day-to-day transportation with a bit more comfort and performance than typically offered by earlier postwar designs. Around 70,000 were made between 1950 and 1966, most of which were these final 192cc versions–earlier models displaced 160 and 175cc, all utilizing an OHV air-cooled single. Interesting features include a stamped, welded and riveted monocoque chassis and a single-sided swingarm, while power is transmitted via a 4-speed gearbox and chain drive. Big wheels gave a good ride and handling, and overall this one does look to be in very nice shape. Find it here on Craigslist near San Francisco, California for $7,975.

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

Full-size tires and wheels were key in Moto Guzzi’s aim to mix the better ride and handling characteristics of a motorcycle with the ease and efficiency of a scooter. This design seems to have inspired 1958’s Honda Cub, still in production today, and with more than 100,000,000 made thus far, the most-produced vehicle in history by a huge margin. Compare that to just 70,000 Galletos, which was nonetheless considered a big success for Moto Guzzi. Note the location of the front/rear interchangeable spare tire, which was thought to offer a bit more crash protection in combo with leg fairings.

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

Inside the pressed sheet metal monocoque frame lives a 192cc overhead-valve, air-cooled single backed up by a 4-speed transmission. Up front we find a leading-link fork suspension, while single-sided swinging arm supports the rear. It’s a good looking bike from most angles, and this color suits it well. As claimed by the ad, condition looks excellent, and though we’re no experts on these unusual bikes, finishes do look like they could be factory.

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

The seller sums up this interesting bike in the first line of the ad: “Innovative motorcycle/scooter hybrid with unique design and daring style.”  According to the ad, the bike weighs 236 lbs. and its 7.5 hp single will propel it to a top speed of 50 mph.

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

Here’s a cool factory illustration detailing the Galleto’s unusual construction. Following the conclusion of WW2, affordable transportation was in high demand across Europe.  Lambretta and Piaggio’s Vespa dominated this segment, and Motto Guzzi launched a similar small wheel prototype hoping to get in on the action. Lambretta caught wind of this, and understandably saw it as a threat.

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

As an act of protest, Lambretta promptly countered Guzzi’s prototype by designing one for a small V-twin motorcycle–a domestic segment controlled by Guzzi–the standoff came to an end when it was decided that staying out of each other’s markets would be best for both companies. As a result, Guzzi scrapped the small-wheel project, and instead began work on a large-wheel design that would eventually lead to production of the Galleto.

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

No photos of the engine are provided, but that’s somewhat understandable considering how well concealed it is. The factory image above shows a super-compact engine/gearbox unit, which also happens to be great to look at.

Not a V-Twin: Italian-Restored 1959 Moto Guzzi Galleto in California

Says the seller: “All mechanical items have been refreshed or rebuilt and the Galleto starts easily, idles smoothly and runs strong. Clutch and 4 speed transmission operate without issue. Brakes are smooth and sure, large wheels and well designed suspension provide a fairly supple ride. Both seats are new, all controls are in excellent condition and proper order. Electrics all function as designed.”

No Reserve: 1991 Honda Africa Twin XRV750 RD04

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This 1991 Honda XRV750 RD04 is a second-generation version of the dual-sport Africa Twin. It receives power from a 742cc 6-valve V-twin paired with 5-speed gearbox, and factory equipment includes a 6-gallon fuel tank, aluminum engine protection, and long-travel suspension. A recent service involved an oil change, new spark plugs, and a new chain. Now showing 77k kilometers (~48k miles), this Africa Twin is being offered by the selling dealer in Rammelsbach, Germany at no reserve with a clear German title.

No Reserve: 1991 Honda Africa Twin XRV750 RD04

Finished in black and white with red and silver camouflage graphics, this RD04 features a 2-person seat, hand guards, and lower fork protectors. Closeups of the fairing, nose panel, and fuel tank are provided in the gallery below. An aftermarket tinted windscreen was installed by a previous owner.

No Reserve: 1991 Honda Africa Twin XRV750 RD04

Braking is managed by double discs up front and a single for the rear. Anodized factory rims measure 21” in diameter up front and 17” out back and are wrapped in a set of knobby tires.

No Reserve: 1991 Honda Africa Twin XRV750 RD04

Analog instrumentation includes 200-km/h speedometer and a 9k-rpm tachometer. 77k kilometers (~48k miles) are shown on the odometer.

No Reserve: 1991 Honda Africa Twin XRV750 RD04

The water-cooled 742cc V-twin utilizes 3-valves and two spark plugs per cylinder. Power is routed to the rear wheel through a 5-speed gearbox, and a new D.I.D gold chain and replacement rear sprocket were installed by the seller just prior to the auction. The oil was also changed and the spark plugs were replaced.

1969 BMW R69US

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This 1969 BMW R69US is equipped with a Heinrich touring tank and a set of Akront aluminum rims. It was reportedly restored in Europe and was acquired by the seller out the previous owner’s estate in 2018. Power is from the numbers-matching 594cc opposed-twin, which is paired with a 4-speed gearbox. Service in late 2018 included an oil change and replacement ignition condenser. This R69US is now offered with a partial tool kit, reproduction service manual, factory owner’s manual, and a clear Tennessee title in the seller’s name.

1969 BMW R69US

The Heinrich touring tank is a period accessory item and holds approximately 7.5 gallons of fuel. It also features a locking tool compartment, which houses the fuel filler. Provisions for securing a tank bag are also located underneath. Headlight-mounted mirrors are fitted along with Hella turn signals and low handlebars. Closeups of the powder-coated frame and pinstriped fenders are provided in the gallery below.

1969 BMW R69US

The R69US was offered for the 1968 and 1969 model years and came equipped with a set of telescopic forks from the factory. Polished aluminum rims from Akront have been laced to the factory drum hubs in place of the original Weinmanns.

1969 BMW R69US

A single metric speedometer is housed in the headlight shell. 17k kilometers (~11k miles) are currently shown on the odometer.

1969 BMW R69US

The 594cc flat-twin was rated by the factory at 42 horsepower and is paired with a 4-speed manual gearbox and enclosed driveshaft. A set of throatier S mufflers remain installed, and bluing and haziness are evident in the chrome. A modern voltage regulator has been added. Closeups of the numbers-matching engine case stamping, steering-tube badge, and frame stamping are provided in the gallery below.

1977 Honda CB550K Custom

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This 1977 Honda CB550K was purchased by the seller a year ago in stock condition and modified as a custom cafe-racer over a subsequent eight-month period. The factory bodywork was removed, and a modified CB500T fuel tank and custom seat pan were fitted along with clip-on handlebars and rearsets. Power is from a 544cc overhead-cam inline-four featuring rebuilt carburetors, velocity stacks, and a 4-into-1 exhaust system, while shifting is through a 5-speed transmission. The seller estimates that just over 100 miles have been added since completion of the build, which was named Balios and documented on social media as well as being featured on pipeburn.com. This custom CB550 is offered with a clean Georgia title in the seller’s name.

1977 Honda CB550K Custom

The modified CB500T fuel tank is finished in a BMW dark metallic blue, which the seller describes as appearing black except in bright light. The fenders were removed, and the custom-formed seat pan is upholstered with faux leather. An enclosure   containing a Shorai lithium battery and other electrical components was reportedly fabricated as a stressed frame member.

1977 Honda CB550K Custom

The license plate and an LED tail light with integrated turn signals are mounted below the seat pan. The drive chain was replaced, and stock shocks fitted. Chrome wire-spoke wheels wear new Avon Road Rider tires. Tarozzi rearsets are affixed to Cognito Moto mounts. Brake work included rebuilds of the master cylinder and front caliper as well as installation of new pads, stainless steel hoses, a drilled front disc, and a Cognito Moto rear linkage.

1977 Honda CB550K Custom

Adjustable Tommaselli clip-on handlebars wear faux leather-wrapped grips and house stock switchgear. New throttle and clutch cables were installed along with tapered steering head bearings, and the relocated ignition switch and aftermarket speedometer are isolated with rubber mounts. The headlight is an HID unit that incorporates LED turn indicators.

1977 Honda CB550K Custom

The single overhead-cam 544cc inline-four produced 38 horsepower in stock trim and is paired with a 5-speed transmission. The case and other aluminum components were cleaned, vapor blasted, polished, and coated. The carburetors have been rebuilt, re-jetted, and tuned to work with velocity stacks and a Delkavic 4-into-1 exhaust.

A cold start video is provided above, with additional clips viewable on the seller’s YouTube channel.