Honda’s First Sports Machine: Nicely Restored 1962 CB77 Super Hawk

This is from the site Bring a Trailer (https://bringatrailer.com/) ...

This 1962 Honda CB77 Super Hawk is a second year example of the bike widely credited as the company’s first truly sporting offering. Despite the 77 nomenclature, power came from a 305cc, OHC parallel twin capable of 28 HP and 9,000 RPM. Performance was on par with similarly configured but larger-engined British bikes of the era, with the added benefit of better build quality and reliability. This one looks exceptionally good, and has been restored to what sounds like a highly accurate standard. Find it here on eBay in San Anselmo, California for $5,700 OBO. Special thanks to BaT reader M. Ladd for this submission.

Honda CB | eBay

Says the seller: “95% of the parts I used were off of the original bike. Frame and engine numbers are within range to be matching and are the same ones from the original title (in the Honda world this is numbers matching). Clean and clear title in my name, registration just renewed and good to 9/2016.” They go on to detail several fastidious details, including a year-correct taillight, front end, and even correctly-patterned OEM hand grips.

Honda CB | eBay

Check out the gauge cluster, which combines a conventionally arced tach and counter-clockwise rotating speedo needle in one distinct housing. Note as well the odd-but-interesting vertical odometer layout, whose displayed 15k and change miles are believed to be correct.

Honda CB | eBay

Listed restoration work included new paint and powder coat, new chrome, cables, rubber parts, a reupholstered seat, new nuts and bolts throughout, fresh bronze swingarm bushings, rebuilt carbs, cylinder head, and oil pump, re-sleeved (to factory bore sizing) cylinders, new tank badges, and more. The seller adds that many hours have been invested, with extra effort on keeping the bike as factory-correct as possible.

a

Though it will never be quick by modern standards, these bikes are fun to ride with nice, tossable handling, an eager, revvy engine, and slick gearbox. Something of a giant-slayer in its day, today the Super Hawk can be viewed as one of–if not the–first “big” bike from Japan, an important role that led the way for the industry as we know it today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *