No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

This is from the site Bring a Trailer (https://bringatrailer.com/) ...

This 1933 Rudge Ulster was restored in 1994 by J.W. Tennant-Eyles of Oxfordshire, England at a cost of just under £19k. It was later imported to the United States, and joined the present owner’s collection about ten years ago. The bike features a black and chrome finish, and is equipped with linked drum brakes, Rudge-designed spoked wheels, and an optional foot shifter. Power is provided by a four-valve, 499cc single-cylinder engine paired with a 4-speed transmission. This Rudge is offered by the selling dealer in Oregon on behalf of the current owner with records, factory literature, correspondence related to the bike, before-and-after photos of the restoration, and a clean California title.

No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

The Ulster was built following motorcycle racer Graham Walker’s victory at the 1928 Ulster Grand Prix, in which the Rudge was the first bike to win a race with an average speed above 80 mph. The resulting Ulster model replicated the race bike, and a previous owner of this example commissioned J.W. Tennant-Eyles of Faringdon, Oxon, England to restore it in the early 1990s. The bike is finished in black with a polished fuel tank, black side panels, and pneumatic knee pads, and equipment includes twin suitcase-style mufflers with fishtail outlets, as well as a luggage rack on the rear fender.

No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

The Rudge-designed spoked wheels measure 21″ in diameter at the front and 20″ at the rear, and braking is handled by a linked brake system with an 8″ front drum and 7.5″ rear drum. Lighting is limited to a single headlamp and a small-diameter light on the rear mudguard.

No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

The bike is equipped with a set of low-rise handlebars with a friction steering damper and a conventional twist throttle, while the clutch and front brake levers pivot from the ends of the handlebars. Instrumentation includes an amperes gauge in the headlight shell and an externally-mounted 120-mph Smiths speedometer. The 5-digit odometer shows 402 miles, and total mileage is unknown.

No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

Power is provided by a 499cc single-cylinder engine with an overhead camshaft and four valves, including a pair of parallel intake valves and radial exhaust valves. The camshaft is driven by a pressure-lubricated external shaft, and induction is handled by an Amal needle-type carburetor. Drive is sent to the rear wheel via a 4-speed transmission with chain primary drive. The engine number is shown in the gallery, and attached correspondence shows that it is double stamped as often occurred with Rudge models at the time.

No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

The seller has started and run the bike using an external fuel supply. The fuel tank has been treated internally with sealant and the sealant has begun to delaminate.

No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

Before and after photos of the bike are included with the restoration documentation.

No Reserve: 1933 Rudge Ulster

A selection of factory literature for the model is included, with some items coming from different years of the Rudge motorcycles. A sample of restoration invoices, message board posts, and letters relating to the bike dating back to the early 1980s are shown in the gallery.

A walk-around video is viewable above.

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