No Reserve: 1960 Cushman Super Eagle

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This 1960 Cushman Super Eagle shows just 9,538 miles and was recently acquired by the selling dealer, who was told the bike has remained in Oregon from new. It is said to retain mostly original paint and is believed to have been maintained in stock condition aside from added luggage carriers and a custom rear bumper assembly. An accessory windshield, optional buddy seat, and an optional crash bar are also present. This Super Eagle is powered by a correct 7.95 horsepower Husky motor paired to a centrifugal clutch 2-speed transmission. It is now being offered at no reserve by Cascadia Classic with its service manual, guide book, parts manuals, and a clean Oregon title. The seller states that this Cushman appears to retain most of its factory paint, which shows patina commensurate with age. According to the seller, the rear bumper assembly is either a fully custom piece or a rare accessory. This bike rides on Cushman-branded tires. The odometer displays 9,538 miles which the seller believes is correct, though documentation is not available to verify total mileage. The 7.95 horsepower Husky motor is paired to a centrifugal clutch 2-speed transmission and both are stock mechanically per the seller. The factory dash-mounted choke pull is disconnected, and a small pull lever has been attached to the carburetor instead. The horn is currently inoperable, and the bike is reported to run and drive nicely. The factory data plate is shown above. A service manual, guide book, and parts manuals will accompany the sale.

1964 BMW R60/2

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This 1964 BMW R60/2 is powered by a 600cc horizontally-opposed twin paired with a 4-speed transmission and has been with the seller for 34 years. Recent work included replacement head gaskets, a valve adjustment, new carburetor gaskets, an air filter, and an oil change, while new OEM mufflers were purchased in Germany and installed in 2017. The motorcycle shows 36k indicated miles and is sold with a factory tool kit, service manuals, a partial collection of parts receipts, and a clean Michigan title. Finished in traditional black with white pinstriping, this example is fitted with a 3.5-gallon fuel tank, Schorsch Meier dual seat, and touring handlebars with replica Hella bar-end turn signals. Black paint shows its age up close with several chips, wax residue, and a small dent on 
the top of the tank. The rear fender was replaced in 1988. Photos are provided to detail the condition of the brightwork, instruments, fasteners, and other hardware. The headlight has been upgraded with a halogen
 bulb and the taillight is a modern LED replacement. The Earles fork front end received new shock absorbers in 2014, as did the rear swingarm. The chromed steel wheels are shown up close in several photos and the seller notes that while the tires have tread remaining, the front shows sidewall cracking and should be replaced. Power comes from a 600cc horizontally-opposed twin with a 4-speed transmission. Newer items include both head gaskets, carburetor gaskets, the battery, and the air filter, while other recent service consisted of a valve adjustment and oil change. The seller notes scratches on the
 valve covers and that a few drops of oil can be seen after a ride despite a replacement oil pan gasket. New mufflers were purchased in Germany in 1984 and installed in 2017. The bike has reportedly been easy to start after storage when proper procedure is followed by the owner. A later-model Karcoma petcock is fitted to the fuel tank, and the original Everbest unit will also be included. A lockable tool box is located behind the left knee pad and holds a replacement bag from 2013 that contains factory tools. BMW pinstriping was performed by hand and often signed by the striper, and a small R can be seen on the bottom of the tank. An owner’s manual and factory service manual will be included as well as a partial collection of parts receipts for maintenance since 1983, which has been performed personally by the seller as documented in a list in the gallery below. The original frame-mounted tire pump is also present and functional. The seller states that the engine and frame numbers match, and believes that after 34 years of enjoyment the time has come for a new owner.

Jawa-Powered Czech Trike in Chicago: 1959 Velorex Oskar 16/250

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This 1959 Velorex Oskar 16/250 (chassis 2402) is one of a few imported by the seller from Europe, and though still in need of a few small finishing touches, the car has been largely restored. These Czech-built three-wheelers were made for about 20 years from 1950 to the early 70’s, and early, single-cylinder examples like this one are reportedly especially rare. Founded by two bicycle mechanic brothers, Velorex made around 17,000 trikes during their time as a car manufacturer, and the company still exists as a maker of sidecars which are exported to the US and elsewhere. The seller has modified this one slightly to allow starting of its factory 248cc Jawa two-stroke single via Bosch Dynastarter, saving the need to bloody your knuckles with the factory dash-mounted “kick start,” and reports that the funky little car is a blast to drive as well. Find it here on eBay in suburban Chicago, Illinois with a $15k BIN. Reads the ad: “I imported this Oskar in 2004 along with few other Velorexes. It was partially restored before I had it shipped to the US. The frame was sandblasted and painted, new tires mounted on refurbished wheels, and the engine was installed but it still needed a lot of work. The Oskar  was purchased by a gentleman from California who wanted to finish the project and to make and install the covers. Alas, a decade  later the car was still sitting in his warehouse untouched. I purchased the Oskar back from him. I ordered a brand new set of custom made covers from Czech Republic-based upholsterer who specializes in Velorex microcars. The material is identical to that used originally by the Velorex factory. I had a mechanic go through the car and finish the mechanical restoration including sorting out the electrical system, ignition, brakes and a lot of little things that popped up along the way.” Continued from the ad: “Unusually for the 16/250, this example is equipped with a Bosch Dynastarter. The installation looks as if it were done at the factory (the side cover looks cast, not modified by simply grinding off the part covering the shaft). At the time, factory did not produce Dynastarter-equipped cars. It happened later with the 16/350. All Velorexes have a short lever in the cockpit attached via long rod to the kick starter shaft. Using this lever to start the engine is a knuckle-busting experience (I speak with authority of, ahem, first-hand experience) when the engine is cold. Once warmed up, well tuned Jawa engine will start without fuss. On suggestion from the mechanic, I had a compression release valve installed to aid in starting the engine with the Dynastarter. It works beautifully. Original head was not harmed in the process. I sourced a replacement and the original, untouched head comes with the car.” Once more from the seller: “Body covers need to be fitted and installed. Windshield needs to be installed (included, along with a seal). Shakedown runs should be performed before taking it for a long drive. For example, on one of my test drives the chain master link came undone. I replaced the chain with a brand new one. Small problems are likely to surface but nothing major.” Here’s a very similar but fully clothed example featured on BaT last year.

1932 BSA 3-Wheeler

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This 1932 BSA 3-Wheeler is a fully restored example of BSA’s front wheel drive 3-wheeler which the previous owner prepared for the show circuit in the UK. While in the United States, the trike has been shown extensively, including an appearance the Amelia Island Concours in 2010, best in show awards at the MG Car Club show and Thunder by the Bay, First Place awards at the Lake Mirror Classic and Florida West Coast Region AACA Car Show, the DuPont award at the Winter Park Concours d’Elegance, and numerous other showings. The car features a 1021cc BSA v-twin driving the front wheels through a front mounted transaxle, and carries a British Tax disc which expired March 24, 1939. The selling dealer is offering this BSA with a clean Florida title. BSA Cars originated as a division of British manufacturing giant Birmingham Small Arms. While BSA motorcycles remained in production from 1910 through the company’s dissolution in the early 1970s, the automobile division failed and was resurrected several times. This 3-wheeler originated with the company’s third attempt at automobile manufacture in 1929, following the end of production of the company’s 10 h.p. light car in 1926. The three-wheeler is constructed with a metal chassis supporting wooden body framing. The exterior bodywork is primarily leather, with metal fenders and a metal bonnet. The leather bodywork on this example is taut, and finished in a two tone black and blue scheme, with the wheels and metal trim painted to match. The seller notes some marks where the trunk meets the leather side panels. A convertible top and side curtains are included, though they are rendered in canvas rather than leather, and feature clear plastic windows. A British tax and registration disc which expired on the 24th of March, 1939 is affixed to the cowl. The interior is finished in blue leather with a wooden dash and blue carpets. A fire extinguisher is mounted on the passenger’s side of the footwell. The cabin floor is fully flat thanks to the front wheel drive layout. 83k miles are shown. Power comes from a 1021cc BSA V-Twin mated to a 3-speed manual transaxle. The seller’s personal mechanic has maintained the car during their five year ownership. The seller states that the trike runs and drives as it should, and they estimate that it has covered fewer than 200 miles since restoration.

No Reserve: 1969 Honda Trail CT90 S&K Suitcase Cycle

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This 1969 Honda Trail CT90 is an early S&K “Suitcase Cycle” conversion showing 863 miles. Approximately 1,000 Suitcase Cycle conversions were built between 1969-1974, designed to disassemble for storage in light aircraft. The bike was originally purchased at the Inglewood, California motorcycle dealership of S&K co-founder Bill Krause’s, and was discovered by the seller four months ago, with 8 miles ridden since. The bike runs a stock 90cc air-cooled single cylinder mated to a 4-speed semi-automatic gearbox with a hi/lo range, and received a fluid change, new battery, and tune-up prior to the sale. Apart from the conversion, it is said to remain unmodified and in original condition. This Honda CT90 is sold with a factory toolkit and a clean Washington title in the seller’s name. The seller describes the bike as a well-preserved example retaining hallmarks of early S&K conversions such as the bobbed rear fender and exhaust and brass frame coupling. During this era of S&K production, paint was reportedly touched up by hand and ground metal was filed but not re-plated. Metal finishes are said to remain in good shape, with some typical thinning seen on factory chrome-plated surfaces. New tubes and tires were installed by the seller. Power is supplied by a 90cc four-stroke air-cooled single piston engine, mated to a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission with a manually-switched 1.867:1 ratio reduction box. The motor is said to run well following the installation of a new spark plug and battery, fresh Motul oil and a valve adjustment. Details of the frame coupling, quick-disconnect electrical lines, and shortened engine guard can be seen here. A quick-release rear axle allows for removal of the rear wheel while leaving the sprocket and chain installed. Full disassembly is said to require about five minutes. The Suitcase Cycle conversion included quick-disconnects for the frame, electrical lines, rear wheel, and luggage rack. A wheeled storage tray used to stow the disassembled bike has gone missing. 863 miles are shown on the odometer, which is believed to be accurate. Corrosion can be seen on the face and bezel of the speedometer, as well as some pitting on the fork crown. Cable housings are cracked and dry. Stickers for S&K co-founder Bill Krause’s motorcycle dealership can be found in several places around the bike. The factory toolkit and blue vinyl tool roll have been preserved and are included in the sale, along with instructions for disassembling and reassembling the bike. A brief walk-around video can be seen below.

1956 James Colonel

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This 1956 James Colonel was imported to the US from England by the seller’s friend in the late 1990s. The seller purchased it 15 years ago and has since added approximately 2k miles. Equipped with a 225cc two-stroke engine and 3-speed gearbox, this example is said to remain largely original. Except for the fuel tank, the paint is believed to be original. This Colonel motorcycle is being offered for sale in New Jersey with its factory owner’s manual and a notarized bill of sale. James was a British cycle manufacturer from 1897 to 1966 who specialized in smaller bikes fitted with engines supplied by Villiers and AMC. The Colonel was the top of the line model and featured a single downtube frame. The seller believes the majority of the paint to be original apart from the tank, which was repainted some time ago and shows some cracking in the finish. The inside of the tank is said to be clean with some minor surface rust detailed in the gallery. Brightwork and chrome spokes are reportedly in good condition with no evidence of pitting. Limited instrumentation includes a Smiths speedometer with an inset odometer showing 8,719 miles. According to the seller, the Lucas headlight and horn function, while the three-speed gearbox reportedly shifts well. The Villiers Mk 1H 225cc two-stroke engine and three-speed gearbox are reported to run and shift well. The transfer case oil was changed several years ago, and approximately 500 miles have been added since. An original service manual is included in the sale. A running video is viewable below.

No Reserve: 1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R

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This 1970 Triumph Bonneville T120R is a numbers-matching example equipped with a a 650cc twin and a 4-speed transmission. Built in the last year before an “oil-in-frame” set up eliminated the separate oil tank, the bike is said to start, shift and stop well. The seller has participated in Lincoln’s once a month Wednesday Bike Night, covering about 100 miles over three summers. The bike was last serviced in 2016, and a $411 parts receipt from The Bonneville Shop in Colorado included new BSA Lightning coils, points, condensers, petcocks/seals, and fuel lines. This Triumph is offered at no reserve with some receipts and a clean Nebraska title in the seller’s name. The bike is said to be unrestored and cosmetically original. Frame paint has a number of chips and is worn through in several locations on the fenders/tank. The seller also notes a couple of dents to the gas tank, as well as a small tear at the front of the seat. Gauges include a Lucas ammeter, along with Smiths tachometer and speedo/odometer. The 12,544 total miles registered are believed accurate. The horn button is present but the horn itself is missing. This short clip shows a kick start and the engine idling. The 4-speed is right-foot shift, and the bike is equipped with a multi-plate wet clutch. A Boyer Bransden electronic ignition is included but not installed, as the seller found the bike tunes-up and runs well on points. The chassis stamp on the frame tubing matches the motor, confirming this is the original unit. A decode provides the following build details: AD – January 1970 production 38756 – Serial number T120R – 650cc Bonneville This 650cc air-cooled OHV vertical twin delivered 46-49 hp when new. The timing cover is non-original and has been repaired, and an oil cooler has been added, although the seller reports it is not needed. There is a minor oil leak believed to be from crankcase, with no other mechanical issues known. Minor corrosion is noted where chrome has failed on the rear rim. Some chrome has also peeled on the tail pipes as shown in gallery photos. No service history or records from prior owners are available.

Nicer Than Most: 1986 BMW R80G/S

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This 1986 BMW R80G/S has racked up over 94k kilometers over the last three decades, but remains in what’s claimed to be largely original and very well preserved condition. Translation is a bit rough, but it sounds like the engine was gone through about 14k kilometers ago by a BMW specialist, and the bike is now reported to run strong. These are great looking bikes in their factory colors as seen here, and condition appears to be as good as promised. Find it here on mobile.de in Essen, Germany for 9,200 euros (-$10,800 USD today). The bike still wears its factory paint scheme, and it looks to be holding up well all over. The tank, fenders, and plastics all appear to be free of noticeable damage, including the graphics. The seat is new, and it sounds like the front brake disc was upgraded to a larger unit. Note the monolever swingarm–it’s supported by a single shock, and doubles as the driveshaft tube for lighter weight and torsional rigidity. The simple instrument cluster houses a speedo and just a few warning lamps, all of which appear to be in good shape housed within their plastic bezel. The odometer reads 94k and change kilometers, but the seller notes a BMW specialist engine rebuild around 14k km back. An 800cc air-cooled boxer sends 50 HP to the shaft-driven rear wheel through a 5-speed transmission. Photo angles aren’t the best, but cosmetics look good here as well. We can’t spot any signs of oxidation, roughed up paint, or corroded hardware. Hoses and wires appear to be newer items too, though these details are left out of the seller’s description. These were known to be pretty competent dual-sport machines in their day, and could be outfitted with a number of factory and aftermarket accessories. Nearly 22,000 were produced over a seven-year period, and though they can still be found pretty easily, few are as nice as the one appears to be.

No Reserve: 1952 Matchless G80

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This 1952 Matchless G80 is powered by a OHV 498cc single and features a swingarm rear suspension. It has been stored in a climate controlled facility as part of the seller’s collection for the past ten years and is currently in non-running condition. A partial refurbishment was performed prior to the seller’s acquisition, and recent work includes rebuilding the Smiths speedometer. The engine turns over, but the spark is weak, and the seller notes that the six-volt battery needs to be replaced. This G80 is being offered at no reserve with a clear Iowa title in the seller’s name. Associated Motorcycles (AMC) resumed production of their the 348cc and 497cc singles in June of 1945, in the line-up was the Matchless G80 and its re-badged counterpart the AJS Model 18. The frame is of traditional lugged steel construction, with a bolt-on rear subframe, Teledraulic fork, and a swingarm rear that was only introduced three years earlier. The Jampot rear shocks would become ubiquitous with AMC singles from the era. The gloss black finish has been refinished in the past, and a reproduction solo-saddle has been fitted, along with a British license plate mount on the front fender. 19″ steel rims are laced to 7″ single leading shoe drums in the front and rear. The Smiths Chronometric speedometer has been rebuilt during the seller’s ownership. The 498cc dry-sump OHV single cylinder traces its roots back to the 1930’s and is known for its low-end torque, a result of its 93mm stroke and 82.5mm bore. This example does not currently run but the seller notes that it turns over and the spark is weak. The 6-volt battery will need to be replaced, but charging is handled by a dynamo mounted behind the cylinder, while a front-mounted Lucas magneto provides ignition. A chain drive primary and wet clutch deliver power to the Burman four-speed gearbox.

1966 Innocenti Lambro 450

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This 1966 Innocenti Lambro 450 was imported to California from Milan, Italy and was restored 10 years ago by the previous owner, who was the proprietor of a well-known Lambretta parts and restoration shop. The previous owner used only NOS and Italian sourced parts during the restoration, and work included modifying the 175cc Lambretta two-stroke single to 230cc with the addition of a Mikuni flat slide carburetor, reed valve, and custom expansion chambers. A stronger rear axle was also fitted, and no service records are available. The seller is an experienced scooter mechanic and has personally performed all recent maintenance, including a brake service. This Lambro is sold with a clean California title in the seller’s name. Named for a tributary of Italy’s Lombardy river, the Lambro was Innocenti’s light utility vehicle built from Lambretta scooter parts. The “450” was the last of the classic single headlight models and refers to its weight capacity. Reportedly restored over 10 years ago, the finish still presents well but is beginning to show its age with some paint chips,  dings on the bed, and corrosion on the hinges and rear leaf springs. The centrally mounted seating position leave little room for passengers, and the handlebar controls are similar to what you might find on a Lambretta scooter. The right hand controls the throttle and front brake while the left hand works the clutch and gear change. Rear brakes are hydraulic and operate with the foot pedal. A push button electric starter has also been added for convenience. The instrumentation is somewhat better, but the seller mentions that the odometer does not work, and the turn signals are inoperable although he believes it may just require a fuse. The transversely mounted 230cc engine is located under the seat and is reported to run strong. An electronic ignition, Mikuni flat slide carburetor, custom expansion chambers, and a reed valve increase  performance from 35-40 mph up to 55 mph according to the seller. The transmission is a heavy duty four-speed similar to what the scooters used but with a provision for reverse. A heavy duty rear axle was adapted from a later model to handle the increase in power. The underside shows signs of regular use with corrosion on the frame, exhaust, and brake lines. The seller states that they serviced the rear brakes in August 2017. No service records are available as the seller has performed all work personally during his brief ownership and will flush and replace all fluids prior to the sale. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-uoX9inNu4&feature=em-share_video_user&app=desktop