Missed Opportunities: 111-Mile 1981 Yamaha TT 500

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This 1981 Yamaha TT 500 (VIN 2Y0000743) is the trail-only variant of the XT Enduro machine that sold well throughout the late 70’s. The bike is claimed to have accumulated just 111 miles since it was new, and remains in a highly preserved state. Its big 499cc single was just given an oil change and tuneup, and is said to start easily and run very well. These are great looking bikes, and plenty fast too. Find this one here on eBay in Abilene, Kansas for $5,800 OBO. Apart from a few minor scuffs to the plastics and slightly dulled white paint, cosmetics appear very good all over. Notably, head and tail lights were added at some point, but the lack of turn signals and gauges means the trail is still its home. The seat vinyl, fork boots, grips and tires all look very good, and there’s no sign of rust on the frame or its hardware. The OHC four-stroke was rated at 27 HP when new, routed through a wide-ratio 5-speed gearbox. The seller says an oil change and tuneup were just completed, and that the motor is in good overall health. Cosmetics look very good here too, with no signs of hardware corrosion, cable damage or surface oxidation. These versatile bikes were known as good trail handlers, and were pretty fast with plenty of low-end torque as well. Getting this one out on the trail and getting it muddied up for the first time might not be easy, but it’d definitely be fun.

Quattro non Sei: 1983 Benelli 654 Sport

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This 1983 Benelli 654 Sport is said to be entirely original, fully functional and in good running condition, though unfortunately the ad gives no historical background or servicing info. The bike is currently without its nose piece fairing, and though we don’t know if it’s included in the sale, we dig the naked look. Six-cylinder Benellis get all the attention, but this is a sharp looking and uncommon bike. Find it here on Gallery Aaldering in Brummen, Netherlands for 8,700 euros (-$10k USD today). Bright red paint retains a good shine from all provided angles, and there’s no evidence of damage to the fairings, side caps or tank that we can see. Graphics and badging look good too, and stainless pieces are bright and unmarred. The seat shows some minor fade and wear, but that’s expected on a machine that’s been ridden. Factory 12 spoke wheels are wearing mismatched, older-looking rubber. The cockpit makes use of clip-on style bars and a twin-dial instrument layout. A few issues worth noting here are slightly hazy warning light lenses and gauge glasses, but the rest of the plastic areas look good, and we don’t see any hardware corrosion. All electrics are said to be working properly, and there’s a bit over 12,200 kilometers shown on the odometer. Note the 9,500 RPM redline as well. The 604cc four breathes through a quartet of Dell’Orto carbs, and pushes 60 HP through a 5-speed transmission. There’s no mention of maintenance records or recent servicing, but the ad does claim that the bike runs well nonetheless. From a cosmetic standpoint the motor presents very well. While it maybe not as desirable as a Sei, this is still an interesting and fairly scarce bike, especially here in the US.

One-Owner 1990 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy

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This 1990 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy shows just over 5,600 miles and was purchased new by the seller as a dealer leftover in 1994. Designed to pay homage to British bikes from the 1950s and 60s, the GB500 is equipped with a 498cc SOHC air-cooled single and a five-speed gearbox. This example remains stock aside from a Supertrapp silencer and a painted rear fender. It has been serviced by the seller during his ownership and recently received a pair of Bridgestone BT45s and a Shorai battery. This example is now being offered with the original fender and exhaust, factory tool kit, and a clean Kansas title in the seller’s name. Initially offered in Japan and then parts of Europe shortly thereafter, the GB500 was only sold in the US between 1989-1990 in one color scheme. This example retains the original black-green finish, and the seller has replaced the chrome rear fender with a NOS unit that has been de-chromed, finished to match, and fitted with a smaller rear tail lamp. Dry-weight is just under 350 pounds, and the steel frame uses a traditional twin-shock and telescopic fork arrangements. The bike also features 18″ D.I.D polished-aluminum wheels along with a front disc brake and a rear drum. A pair of Bridgestone Battlax BT45s were recently installed by the seller. The 498cc single is derived from the XL600 engine and was factory rated at 38 hp and 26 lb-ft of torque when new. It uses a gear mounted balance shaft to help keep vibration down, a dry-sump oiling system, and a wet-plate clutch with a five-speed gearbox. The seller has replaced the original silencer with Supertrapp unit. The original exhaust, rear fender, tail light, and under-seat tool kit are included with the sale. A video taken by the seller can be seen below.

Never Titled Rotary: 1975 Suzuki RE5

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This 1975 Suzuki RE5 is from the middle of a three-year production run and is said to have been in storage from 1975 until recently. The bike has never been titled, but did rack up 3,079 miles as an aftermarket fairing demonstrator according to the seller. It shows some use, but overall seems nicely preserved and even includes dealer repair tools and a boxed NOS fuel tank. Last running a year ago, the bike will need to be gone through prior to starting again, but apart from the sissy bar it looks to be all stock. Find it here on Craigslist in Anderson, Indiana for $6,500. Gauges are housed in a pod whose shape is repeated in the taillight. The front brake is seized but an NOS repair kit is included and overall condition looks very good despite some pitting on various pieces of brightwork. Some polishing compound and elbow grease will probably go a long way, and judging by the apparently excellent condition of the original tank, its paint finish and decals, there should be no reason to swap on the included NOS item. The green-tinted gauge cluster “dust cover” slides back to fully reveal the gauges, a neat touch by Giugiaro who was commissioned to style these bikes. Late production ’76 models dispensed with the “tin can” instrument pod in a failed effort to attract more buyers. Here’s a look at the 497cc single-rotor Wankel, factory rated at 62 HP. These were heavy bikes at just under 575 pounds wet, and even with liquid cooling they had a tendency to run hot. They made for comfortable, virtually vibration-free cruisers though, and remain undeniably interesting from a technical standpoint. Note the big radiator and standard exhaust, the latter of which was fitted with an OEM decal warning: “DO NOT MODIFY THE EXHAUST SYSTEM. IT IS DESIGNED TO GIVE MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE WITHOUT EXCESSIVE NOISE.”

No Reserve: 1996 BMW R850R w/ Sidecar

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This 1996 BMW R850R has been fitted with a DMC sidecar and Öhlins rear shock as well as a number of other accessories and upgrades as detailed below. The selling dealer acquired the bike five years ago and is its fourth owner. It was purchased with the intent of utilizing the sidecar for his dog, who reportedly remains uninterested after many attempts. The clutch and rear main seal were replaced at 32k miles, and the odometer now shows just over 48k indicated miles. Described as ready to ride, this R850R is sold with records back to the second owner and a clean Illinois title. The DMC model M72D sidecar was sourced at a reported cost of over $6k before accessories, color-matched paint, and professional installation. A matching OEM tri-spoke wheel and BMW badging were fitted to lend a factory look. Sidecar upgrades include a windscreen, apron, fuel can, 12-volt charging port, and Hella driving light, as well as a luggage rack mounted over the rear storage compartment. Metallic green paint is described as presentable overall with a handful of scratches and other blemishes from use. Additional touches include a Parabellum fairing, aftermarket seat, hand guards, BMW hard-sided saddle bags, and tank protector. Factory switchgear is detailed in close-up photos below. Instrumentation includes a 150 mph speedo as well as an OEM accessory tachometer and clock. The odometer currently shows just over 48k miles, 3k of which have been added by the seller. The 848cc air-cooled, four-valve “oilhead” boxer twin uses Bosch electronic fuel injection and was rated at 73 horsepower when new. Power is sent to the rear wheel via a single-disc dry clutch, 5-speed transmission, and shaft drive. Suspension includes a Telelever front fork and a single Paralever rear swingarm upgraded with an Öhlins shock. A brief video is included to show the motorcycle running and driving. Service records from the second owner are described as extensive and include replacement of the clutch and rear main seal at 32k miles. Fluids were last changed at the end of the 2016 riding season.

No Reserve: 1968 Honda CL90

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This 1968 Honda CL90 is a Scrambler model which has reportedly been in California since new. The Scrambler was mechanically similar to other Honda 90s of the period but featured off-road touches including a high mounted exhaust, extra rear fender clearance, and a handlebar brace. This example is described as largely original by the seller, who has ridden it approximately 1,300 miles since purchasing it from a friend 21 years ago. Recent work includes cleaning of the carburetor jets and replacement of the speedometer cable. The motorcycle is sold with a clean California title in the seller’s name. All CL90s came with silver-painted tanks, here faded and showing the occasional ding or scratch. Pressed steel frames were available in three colors including the black seen here. Brightwork shows its age throughout, including a rear fender bearing an STP decal that was given to the seller by Richard Petty. The condition of the tank pads, seat upholstery, handgrips, and other soft items is shown in close-up photos below. Simple switchgear is also detailed along with the Denso speedometer and 5-digit odometer, which currently shows just under 8,200 miles. Wire wheels wear older tires with extensive sidewall cracking. A black California license plate is retained out back, and the seller notes that its registration tag has now been brought current through 2018. The 90cc 4-stroke, overhead-cam single made eight horsepower from the factory for a claimed top speed just north of 60 mph. The 4-speed transmission uses a standard hand-operated clutch and was reportedly rebuilt to fix a failing second gear soon after the seller’s purchase. Walk-around and start-up videos have been added below. https://youtu.be/lVK3KRnE7Wo https://youtu.be/inklrxdSBc4

Exotic Homologation Special: 442-Mile 1985 Honda VF1000R

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This 1985 Honda VF1000R (VIN JH25C1602FM001933) was stored indoors for the last 27 years according to the seller, and has been ridden only 442 miles since it rolled out of the factory. Condition looks excellent in accordance with these claims, and the jewel-like, gear cam drive V4 was just given a tuneup as part of a larger mechanical refresh. These bikes were built to satisfy homologation requirements for Honda’s entry into the F1 class, and though a bit on the heavy and soft side for a sports bike, they remain important, technically fascinating pieces of Japanese motorcycle history. Find this one here on eBay in Richmond, Texas with reserve not met. We dig the full fairings, windscreen and twin taillights these bikes come with, and especially the HRC colors. From top to bottom the bike presents largely as new, which if described accurately it pretty much is. Honda’s adjustable, anti-dive fork is fitted with twin 285mm discs, and while new and correctly-sized rubber was fitted here, a slightly larger-than-stock tire was chosen for the rear. The cockpit maintains a like-new appearance with good-looking instrumentation, hardware, and plastics. The handlebars are adjustable clip-ons, and the seller says all control cables have been lubed and adjusted. The steer tube was also checked and adjusted, and all chassis fittings were checked and re-torqued as needed. The 998cc V4 employed gear-driven dual camshafts that enabled more precise valve timing and higher power output, though at the expense of some extra weight and noise–the latter of which is actually a big part of the appeal for many. Output was rated at 120 HP with an 11k RPM redline. An aftermarket top-end oiling system was added to help remedy a known factory oil starvation issue, the battery and spark plugs have been replaced, and both cooling and brake systems have been flushed–new stainless lines are noted as well. In back, the shock has been upgraded to a custom-valved Hagon coilover. Though heavier and not as finely balanced for track work as its cross-brand rivals at the time, these bikes were known as great high-speed runners, and ultimately helped set the mold for the sublime MkI VFR750 and all subsequent V4 sports tourers, a line which continues to this day. These special machines don’t come up for sale all that often, and this one’s low mileage and excellent state of preservation definitely make it a standout.

Very First Four: 1967 MV Agusta 4C6 Serial One

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This 1967 MV Agusta 4C6 is reportedly the very first production four-cylinder built by the storied Italian marque, and the seller further claims that it remains unrestored. The beautifully sand-cast, gold colored engine block with integral sump cooling fins is a work of art in its own right, even if styling isn’t quite up to par. Just under 130 4C6’s were made before MV Agusta switched to 750’s, making them a rare find in any condition, and the seller says this one turns 50 years old this month. Find it here on eBay in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, France with a whopping $1m USD starting bid. Special thanks to BaT reader Jules for this submission. Affectionately nicknamed The Black Pig, 4C6’s were also sometimes referred to as 600-4 in factory literature. These bikes weighed in just a few pounds shy of a quarter ton, so even with 60 HP worth of multi-cylinder grunt on offer they were never sports machines, even by standards of the day. Reads the ad: “Perfectly preserved, never restored, carrying the very good smell of the real thing. Original pre-series engine, the very first street-legal one with particular casting. Comes with the best original paperwork you can dream of, including the original, fully-stamped libretto (Italian logbook), original MV invoice etc. Bike still carrying its original plate, toolkit with untouched tools, its original keys and leather holder etc.”

No Reserve: 2007 Jack Pine Triumph Scrambler

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This 2007 Triumph Scrambler was customized by Hammarhead Industries in 2011 and turned into one of their Jack Pine bikes. The treatment consisted of matte black paint, removal of the oil cooler, shortening the rear frame loop by 4 inches, a reworked seat unit, adding Works Performance fork springs with twin shocks, and lightening the motorcycle down to about 450 pounds dry. The seller purchased this bike in 2012 and has added rear passenger pegs and high-rise handle bars. This Scrambler is now being offered at no reserve with service records since 2012 and a clean California title in the seller’s name. This Scrambler was produced in September 2006 as a 2007 model and was sold new in California. The Jack Pine conversion was meant to resemble some of the minimalist motorbikes produced during the 1950s and 1960s which were made famous by stars such as Steve McQueen. The speedometer/odometer has been removed in addition to several other components, giving the bike a purposeful look. The seller lists current flaws as some road rash on the left-rear shock adjuster, various small nicks and chips, dry/cracking grips, and rubber air filter mounts that need replacement. The rear indicators are currently zip-tied in place. The seller estimates they have added  about 550 miles. This bike features an 865cc engine with a sequential transmission which have received proactive maintenance during the seller’s ownership. Service records since 2012 are included with the sale and the most recent service was carried out six months ago–the bike has been driven just two miles since. An article from Cycle World in 2011 details the Jack Pine Scrambler, while a detailed interview by Peter Egan profiles Hammarhead’s founder and the philosophy behind this model below:

Globetrotting Battletwin: 1989 Buell RR 1200

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This 1989 Buell RR 1200 is an evolution of the earlier RR 1000 Battletwin, the make’s first street bike which itself was based on a racer which became redundant when the AMA dropped Formula One in 1986. In standard Buell practice the bike utilizes an in-house developed trellis frame with motivation delivered by a Harley-Davdison V-twin, in this case a 68 HP 1203cc Evo unit. These were interesting, limited-production bikes, and this one’s said to have just 567 miles from new. It reportedly benefits from a full recommissioning performed a year ago, and is now said to be in fully functional condition. Find it here on eBay in Grants Pass, Oregon with no reserve. Special thanks to BaT reader Boris for this submission. The seller admits to “some small scratches and touch-ups,” but insists that overall the bike remains in very nice condition. The bike has very few miles, but has bounced around the globe quite a bit: “This bike was sold new by Warr’s Harley-Davidson in London, England to a prominent member of the Buell Owner’s Group. It consequently was brought back to the US to be sold by Bonhams at an auction in California and went to Australia from there.” Styling is clearly of its time, but it still looks cool to our eyes, and it’s worth noting that aerodynamics were good enough that a modified example touched nearly 191 MPH at Bonneville in 1991, a class land speed record. Mechanical details are limited, but the seller notes a recommissioning effort dating back 12 months, adding that the bike is now fully functional. The blackened exhaust pipes and tattered wrap may suggest higher mileage, but regardless the bike remains a rare and interesting sight.