No Reserve: 1962 Sears Puch Compact D50 Scooter

This is from the site Bring a Trailer (https://bringatrailer.com/) ...

This 1962 Sears Puch Compact Scooter is an early model that has been preserved in near-original condition with 707 miles on the odometer. The scooter is unrestored in bright white with red seat and trim, and features its original 60cc two-stroke engine and three-speed transmission. Sears began carrying Puch scooters in 1961, and though these models can be confused with Sears Allstate brand scooters, they do not have Allstate badges or decals. The owner reports that this Puch starts on the first kick and runs well. The scooter recently received new fluids and is sold on a bill of sale.

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The seller rode the scooter during the Bikes & Blues Festival in Silver City, New Mexico in late May, and says it attracted just as much attention as the big Harleys. The seller notes he had the scooter up to 35 mph, but slowed when he remembered the tires and tubes are 54 years old.

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The paint, decals, seat cover and foam, rubber floorboard mats, chrome trim, and tires are all said to be original.

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Headlight, brake light, speedometer, and horn are said to work. Note the vintage Sears logo on the back of the seat.

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Although the scooter has been stored in a garage, some surface rust and paint damage are evident, particularly on the chain guard and the edges of the floorboards.

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The engine is a one-cylinder 2-stroke unit with a 3-speed gearbox. When new, the engine produced 3.9hp and was said to get 100mpg. It was reportedly capable of speeds up to 42 mph. Because these models were sold as a “50”, it was not subject to registration requirements, and therefore has never been titled. The seller believes the true displacement is 60cc.

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The VDO speedometer and odometer are said to function, and the imperfection in the speedo lens is actually an old spider web. Chrome trim surround shows light pitting.

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The model number can be seen on the plate above. The seller recently serviced the scooter by changing the transmission fluid, lubricating cables, and cleaning the fuel tank. He notes that the tires show no dry rot and were retained for originality, but should be replaced before the scooter is driven further. A set of believed original tools are marked as Made in Austria and can be viewed in the gallery below. They fit in a storage compartment under the seat and are included the sale.

Honda Birdee – Mokka Cycles GL500 Interstate

Since 2012 Árpád Bozi, Ferenc Halász and Balint Koch’s company ‘Mokka Cycles’ has been one of the major driving forces behind Hungary’s Cafe Racer scene. Based just south of Budapest’s city centre their workshop is set to become a hub of motorcycle activity. With plans to soon open their own storefront, cafe and chill out space, Mokka Cycles will become one of the countries only hospitality venues designed specifically for motorcyclists. Along with expanding their business offering the Mokka team are also are continuing to push the boundaries with their custom builds. Their latest creation, which is based on a 1982 Honda GL500 Interstate is no exception.
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Cafe Racer Build – Lotta Work, Not a lotta money

This build comes to us from Cosmin Andrei. Below he talks about the build in his own words. Our names are Cosmin and Paul. We are the guilty dudes that started this. My friend Paul had in his garage a Kawasaki GPZ 500s in good condition (just ugly from our point of view). We wanted […]

The post Cafe Racer Build – Lotta Work, Not a lotta money appeared first on Cafe Racer TV.

Nate’s Burly CB – PopBang Honda Cafe Racer

This little Honda CB400F ended up with me after an impulse buy at the Mudgeeraba swap meet in Queensland. After a bit of haggling, I handed over $350 and it was mine. It was reasonably stock other that a rattle can paint job on the tank with bashed in knee wells. The motor had been pulled out and the top end lifted off, but it was all there. I got it back to my workshop, basically stuck it up on the mezzanine and forgot about it. It wasn’t until a couple of big burly looking fellas came in wanting me to build a couple of bikes for them and asked what I had. All I had was a CX500 in a million pieces and this 1974 CB400f project. They argued over who would get which one and the one that ended up choosing the CB was none other than NRL superstar and just general legend Nate Myles.
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Long overdue update – Issue 8 just about done

Wow, hadn’t realised that we hadn’t posted for such a long time on this blog, so many apologies if you’ve come along and expected to see some updates. Issue 8 is finally just about done, and it’s taken a long time for many reasons, but sorry for such a long wait. It’s just tough trying to a magazine and earn a living at the same time. One feature will be about the individual Ducati Scramblers that we enjoyed some months ago, see pic above.

As we posted some months ago, our Facebook page is the place to go for updates. This blog format is old fashioned and tedious to use, whereas Facebook is quick to use. We’r ehoping to build a new website too soon with a decent blog page incorporated. Our FB page is at: www.facebook.com/ITALIANMOTORMAG

More updates here soon.

Ardent Featherbed – Harley Sportster Cafe Racer

As any artist will tell you, composition is everything. Over his 30 year career as an artist Curtis Miller has fashioned custom furniture, worked as an animator and had his paintings and photographs sold in galleries. Now at 59 years young he’s begun applying his skills to custom motorcycle building and as you would expect they are bona fide works of art, but in terms of composition, it’s how his bikes are put together that really makes them special…

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Diesel Cafe Racer – HSP69 Ducati Monster

I’ve been saying it for years now, and I will say it again. Ducati’s Monster is destined to become a popular choice of donor for custom motorcycle builders. The Monster is after all credited as being the motorcycle that spawned the modern ‘naked bike’ movement. It’s styling makes it the perfect candidate for a Cafe Racer conversion and there’s literally thousands of secondhand ones available world wide. For now though it seems that my words have gone unheard, so perhaps this custom Monster from HSP.69 in Korea will do the trick.
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Honda’s First Sports Machine: Nicely Restored 1962 CB77 Super Hawk

This is from the site Bring a Trailer (https://bringatrailer.com/) ...

This 1962 Honda CB77 Super Hawk is a second year example of the bike widely credited as the company’s first truly sporting offering. Despite the 77 nomenclature, power came from a 305cc, OHC parallel twin capable of 28 HP and 9,000 RPM. Performance was on par with similarly configured but larger-engined British bikes of the era, with the added benefit of better build quality and reliability. This one looks exceptionally good, and has been restored to what sounds like a highly accurate standard. Find it here on eBay in San Anselmo, California for $5,700 OBO. Special thanks to BaT reader M. Ladd for this submission.

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Says the seller: “95% of the parts I used were off of the original bike. Frame and engine numbers are within range to be matching and are the same ones from the original title (in the Honda world this is numbers matching). Clean and clear title in my name, registration just renewed and good to 9/2016.” They go on to detail several fastidious details, including a year-correct taillight, front end, and even correctly-patterned OEM hand grips.

Honda CB | eBay

Check out the gauge cluster, which combines a conventionally arced tach and counter-clockwise rotating speedo needle in one distinct housing. Note as well the odd-but-interesting vertical odometer layout, whose displayed 15k and change miles are believed to be correct.

Honda CB | eBay

Listed restoration work included new paint and powder coat, new chrome, cables, rubber parts, a reupholstered seat, new nuts and bolts throughout, fresh bronze swingarm bushings, rebuilt carbs, cylinder head, and oil pump, re-sleeved (to factory bore sizing) cylinders, new tank badges, and more. The seller adds that many hours have been invested, with extra effort on keeping the bike as factory-correct as possible.

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Though it will never be quick by modern standards, these bikes are fun to ride with nice, tossable handling, an eager, revvy engine, and slick gearbox. Something of a giant-slayer in its day, today the Super Hawk can be viewed as one of–if not the–first “big” bike from Japan, an important role that led the way for the industry as we know it today.

1951 Ardie B-251

This is from the site Bring a Trailer (https://bringatrailer.com/) ...

This 1951 Ardie B-251 is an uncommonly seen two-seater runabout manufactured in Nuremburg during Germany’s post-WWII recovery period. An older refurbishment was reportedly carried out by an American expat in Germany, from whom the seller purchased it while stationed there. The motorcycle was then shipped to the US in 2010, where it has been stored under cover in a garage for the ensuing six years. The engine starts and runs but will need some attention as detailed below. Documentation includes parts invoices and the original owner’s purchase paperwork from Ardie-Werk A.G., and an Ohio title is included.

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Black paint still shines well overall but exhibits signs of wear including a handful of chips and a one-inch scratch on the fuel tank, and would likely benefit from a good polish. Pagusa seats, grips, fork bellows and other rubber items appear to be in good shape. A period rack and rearview mirror have been fitted, and chrome spoked wheels wear Metzlers with substantial tread remaining.

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Chrome is presentable but shows light pitting throughout, and the normally chrome headlight bezel has been painted black. Age-related patina is visible on badging, fork braces and other aluminum parts. The painted steel double-cradle frame appears largely devoid of corrosion in photos.

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Power comes from a 245cc two-stroke single which was last started and run in 2015 – starting is via a kick pedal and the motor runs on a 1:25 oil to fuel mixture. The carburetor will need to be cleaned, a tuneup performed and the battery replaced according to the seller. Peak power came at 5000 rpm and at just under 300 pounds, the B251 was supposedly capable of nearly 60mph when in good tune.

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A four-speed manual gearbox is mounted inside the ribbed engine case and sends approximately 10.5 horsepower to the chain-driven rear wheel. Drum brakes are fitted at both ends and suspension is via a standard telescoping fork in front and Jurisch-type plunger in the rear. The bike’s last service was in Germany when it was still being used regularly.

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After six years of storage the bike is being sold to help with a move to New Mexico for medical school. A handful of German service records are included in the sale, along with period technical manuals and the bike’s original German title.

VTR Rad Roadster – Goodwood BMW R1200R

When it comes to modern BMWs the R nineT has been stealing the custom spotlight since its release in 2014. Being designed with that express purpose in mind plays a big role in that outcome, but why should it be the only one getting all the attention? Switzerland’s official BMW dealership ‘Stucki 2 Rad’ had built their fair share of custom R nineTs so they put that same question to their custom department ‘VTR Customs’. In their search for an alternative the VTR team considered everything BMW Motorrad had on offer and it was the R1200R Roadster that stood out as the best candidate. 

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