Anything but vanilla – Kinesis Moto Honda CB350F

“Vanilla”. It’s not a term builders tend to use when introducing their motorcycles, but in this case there’s good reason. Jeff Gittleson describes his ’73 Honda CB350F as “Vanilla. A no frills build wearing only the essential parts for the function machine”. So rather than the ‘dull’ or ‘boring’ definition we tend to apply to the term in Jeff’s case it’s all about purity; and the analogy is one he’s using for the work he produces out of his Kinesis Moto workshop.

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Proto ATV: Nicely Preserved 1971 Honda ATC90

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This 1971 Honda ATC90 is a third model year example of the vehicle widely credited as the first ATV. There were earlier ATV-like machines of course, but the ATC was arguably the first to offer go-anywhere performance within a neatly packaged, easy-to-ride, reliable, attractive, and compact package. This one appears to be in remarkably well-preserved condition, and a similar, slightly scruffier (but still very nice) bright green example is also available separately. Find the red one here on eBay in Staten Island, New York with reserve not met. Special thanks to BaT reader Kyle K. for this submission.

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The trike is described as all-original, and sounds to have been carefully stored by its original owner for many years. Running condition isn’t mentioned, but the seller does refer to condition as “mint.” A few very minor signs of use like the scratched tank show that this assessment is perhaps a bit glowing, but overall, condition does look to be quite impressive.

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Power comes from a neatly packaged, 90cc, OHC four good for about 7 HP at 8,500 RPM. This is passed to the rear axle via an automatic clutch (the lever is for the single, rear-only brake) and interesting dual-range 4-speed gearbox–effectively offering eight forward gears. Balloon-like tires appear to be OEM and presumably are still in good shape, as only the green example is said to need new ones–sourcing suitable replacements might not be easy. Low pressure allows for better traction on snow, sand, and mud, and also negates the need for a traditional suspension system.

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Notably, the green example is said to run, and the seller adds that it can be had for $4,500. Presumably this red trike is still running as well, as reserve is still not met at $5k at the time of writing.

The Duke of Jakarta – Studio Motor KTM Cafe Racer

If you happen to follow Return of the Cafe Racers movements on Facebook or Instagram you’d have seen we spent a fair bit of time over in the Emerald Isle, otherwise known as Indonesia, last year. We discovered an incredible amount of talented custom builders spread throughout the country, but it was in their capital of Jakarta, where we first met Donny Ariyanto, owner of one of the countries best known custom workshops, Studio Motor.
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American Cafe Racer – Buell XBR12R Custom

There seems to be a revolution occuring in café racer enthusiast circles. Rather than opting for your typical go to platforms like Triumph’s Bonneville or Honda’s CB series, more and more builders are thinking outside the box. “I like to consider myself a normal motorcycle enthusiast.” Miguel Padilla tells us. “Last year in a motorcycle accident, I fractured 5 ribs and suffered a range of injuries that kept me away from riding for the better part of the year. During that time, I decided to create a modern American Café Racer”. A Harley would have been the obvious choice, but instead he opted for Eric Buell’s torque happy v-twin XBR12R Firebolt.

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A Classic Cafe Racer – The Yoshida Machine Triton

Aside from being the most iconic of all Cafe Racers, what really makes the Triton special is how it came to be. Unlike other classic bikes from the same era, the Triton was never a factory built motorcycle. Instead it was dreamt up by home builders in the UK during the late 1950s as a means to an end. They wanted faster, better handling machines than the motorcycles being sold by manufacturers and the solution was to simply create their own.
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No Reserve: 2003 Ducati Monster 1000 S

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This 2003 Ducati Monster 1000 Si.e. has covered just 2500 miles from new and is described as a garage queen in a relatively rare color scheme. Its seller purchased it in 2005 with less than 200 miles, then sold it to his best friend – it then passed through the hands of another mutual friend before eventually coming back in trade. Modifications are limited to a Corbin seat and Remus exhaust, and service records are included. The condition is described as excellent detailed as detailed in the gallery below, and the sale includes a clean New York title.

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Initially designed for 1993 by Miguel Galluzzi, the Monster helped usher in the popular “naked street bike” category and cosmetics remain largely unchanged today. This example features a relatively uncommon metallic grey with red three-spoked Marchessini lightweight wheels – its tank, frame, running gear and fasteners appear very clean and retain factory decals.

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Up top, a Corbin leather seat was installed by a previous owner – wide bars and adjustable control levers were standard. Few signs of use are present besides a deep scratch in the face of the 11,000rpm tach.

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The air-cooled 992cc desmodromic-valved twin was a new iteration for 2003. The Dual Spark injected motor provided roughly 84 horsepower in stock form and a fat torque curve to propel a 415-pound dry weight.

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Remus carbon fiber high pipes are the only other aftermarket addition and sound great according to the seller. Overall performance is described as near factory specification.

The video above shows a brief walkaround and demonstrates the engine being started up and how the Remus pipes sound when the bike is revved.

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Power is fed through a six-speed transmission to the chain-driven rear wheel mounted in a double-sided aluminum swingarm.

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Twin Brembo four-piston calipers with 320 mm discs provide stopping power, and the fully adjustable Showa fork and single-shock rear suspension work in concert with frame geometry designed for confident handling.

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Reportedly always maintained according to time increments rather than mileage, the bike’s last service was in fall 2015 and records are included.

Rotorbike Part Two: Low Mileage 1976 Suzuki RE5

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This 1976 Suzuki RE5 is the second rotary-powered bike featured this week, following yesterday’s impressive and all-original Hercules W-2000 from the same year. Following 32 years in dark indoors storage, this one sounds to be in similar condition with similarly low mileage (~3,700), though the seller does note some light restoration work. Described as fully functional and strong running, it looks to be in very nice shape. Find it here on eBay in Dayton, Ohio with a $9,750 BIN. Special thanks to BaT reader pluckmyeyeout for this submission.

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Says the seller: “This RE5 was a true barn find where it sat for 32 years in the dark. No sunlight touched it, hence the paint, seat, tires, and plastic bits are as close to original as you will ever find. The overall condition is excellent, and is very close to museum quality after two years of work.” What that work included is fully listed, though the ad does note some hardware has been replaced as needed, and that the front fender and part of the exhaust have been re-chromed.

Suzuki Re5 | eBay

Speaking of the exhaust, check out the full gallery and its closeup of a factory-applied sticker sternly warning: “DO NOT MODIFY THE EXHAUST SYSTEM. IT IS DESIGNED TO GIVE MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE WITHOUT EXCESSIVE NOISE.” Whereas yesterday’s German rotorbike ran an air-cooled, 294cc single-rotor, this one features a 497cc water-cooled Wankel, also a single-rotor design. Though just over twice as powerful with 62 HP, these Suzukis were also substantially heavier thanks to the added complexity of liquid-cooling. This one’s said to be both great running and fully functional.

Suzuki Re5 | eBay

Looks like the full original toolkit and owner’s manual are included as well. How cool would it be to ride these two bikes back-to-back?

Dainese 36060 Collection – Cooper Boots

The line between functional riding gear and fashionable motorcycle attire has most certainly been blurred. Over the past few years there’s been a plethora of new motorcyclist fashion brands built around the “look good and be safe” ethos. It seems though that many of the older brands have been hesitant to take part in the new trend, probably thinking this was all “just a flash in the pan fad”, sticking to their tried and tested, albeit old and outdated design approach. Thankfully that attitude is now finally starting to change and we’re seeing some of our favourite brands getting involved.

Since 1970 Dainese have been producing exceptional quality and top performing protective riding gear. Now, some 40 years later, they are retracing their own heritage to produce the Cooper Boot as part of their new 36060 collection.
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Rare & All Original Rotary: 9K Mile 1976 Hercules W-2000 Wankel

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This 1976 Hercules W-2000 (serial 480005185) is one of 1,800 built in Germany between 1974 and ’77. One of only a handful of production Wankel rotary engine-powered motorcycle designs, this one is said to be all-original with 8,550 miles from new, and it looks quite well-preserved in photos. The seller adds that it starts very easily, and runs and rides like new. Find it here on eBay in Chicago, Illinois with reserve not met. Special thanks to BaT reader Kyle K. for this submission.

Other Makes w 2000 | eBay

The ad notes that “all-original” claims extend to the paint, seat, and its pan, and all are claimed to be in very nice condition. A large gallery of high-resolution, well-lit and composed photos show this to be true, with the bike displaying just enough patina to let you know it hasn’t been restored. These rare machines pop up for sale from time-to-time, but it’s safe to say this one’s probably one of the best left outside of a museum.

Other Makes w 2000 | eBay

Says the seller: “When I purchased this particular machine, it was in the condition you see in the photos, but it did not run. I went through the entire machine and got everything working. All of the major engine, transmission, and braking components are operational. The tires are very nice and are the correct type and size. The brakes have also been completely rebuilt, front and rear. The engine and transmission are original and are in perfect running condition.”

Other Makes w 2000 | eBay

As can be clearly seen below, Sachs designed and built these bikes’ 294cc, single-rotor Wankel. Output was about 30 HP at 6,500 RPM, and all but the last 199 built required pre-mixed fuel. According to a quoted fact snipped posted in the full ad, these bikes run dry crankcases (so to speak–shaft housing may be a more accurate description), in contrast to the rotary-engined Suzuki RE-5. It also notes that mixed oil is not of two-stroke type. Still, it remains unclear whether this machine is an “Automix” model.

Other Makes w 2000 | eBay

Power is routed through a 6-speed, and the full ad contains many interesting images scanned from contemporary and modern magazine articles covering both this bike and Suzuki’s Wankel two-wheeler. Criticized when new as expensive and slow with inadequate ground clearance, the passage of time has lessened the impact of its shortcomings, and enhanced its finer qualities like good build quality, simple, handsome styling, and gem-like engine.

Lean and Green – MotoHangar Virago XV750

Pat Jones has been running his MotoHangar workshop out of Vienna, Virginia now since 2010. During that time I’ve featured a handful of his builds on these pages and have always been a fan of his simplistic approach to customising classic Japanese motorcycles. His latest work, based on a 1983 shaft drive version of Yamaha’s XV750 Virago, is no exception. Unlike many of his other builds though, this one was turned around in a measly 3 weeks.
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