Buy Your Moto Guzzi Locally

Dealer sets up bikes right before he sells them so problems are reduced. If there are problems, dealer deals with them promptly. Customer gets bike that runs great and he is happy, so happy that he tells all his friends how great his bike is. People that ride with him see how many trouble free miles he puts on his bike and how well it goes in the real world. Very easy to imagine that over all these years of a dealer doing business that way, there would be a lot of Guzzi’s in the area.

— an excellent quote from the Wild Goose Chase Moto Guzzi forum about Moto International Moto Guzzi

Jim Barron of Rose Farm Classics
Jim Barron of Rose Farm Classics

And that’s why you should buy locally if you have the dealer that is of this quality — and Moto International does have some peers across the country.  If you get a good deal on your Guzzi from someone out of town that’s set up quick and dirty, what do you expect the local dealer to tell you when you bring it in?  Are you telling your friends to buy from him?  Are you buying from him?  If you come in with an emergency and he’s got 3 bikes on his lifts from local customers, what can you rightfully expect?
Don’t go cheap up front.  I know very dedicated dealers in Thousand Oaks, Woodstock IL and Phoenix AZ.  I have talked on the phone to dozens of others, notably Mr Field in helping me diagnose some Eldorado problems.  Spend some time doing your research and talk to your local dealer about his services and policies.  Chances are you live in a city, so you might have a choice of vendors.  Take your time, build some trust.

I probably paid more for my 1200 Sport than I would have if I had purchased one from the internet, but I solidified a friendship with a guy that “deserved” to sell me the bike.  It has already paid dividends in the ongoing service and the absolutely flawless set-up of the bike.  I’d rather give my friends money — I know its staying in the community, educating their kids and making my life incrementally richer.

I liked it so much I Bought my Own!

Limited resources are commonplace in today’s economy, and our new house in Oak Park, IL also has limited space to put bikes.  Since moving there, I’ve decided to add another bike to my stable, but in agreement with my wife who really didn’t want to look out the window at too many two-wheeled critters, I decided that one had to go.  I had “loved” the Ducati ST2 and ridden the heck out of it over the last 11 months, but I never “fell in love” with it.  I didn’t have a lot of remorse about parting with the bike — now it was time to choose what to replace it with.

The 86 LeMans that I’d looked at last year was still for sale, even cheaper.  My checkbook was out.  Too many subject matter experts said that it was in need of too much work.  Between that and the 2500 miles’ distance, I took a pass.  I looked at SPs, G5s, a couple of gorgeous T3s.  There was an incredibly low-mileage Quota in Joplin. There was a beautiful 1000s.  I was going to get a Guzzi.  Just didn’t know which one.

My spanking new 1200 Sport
My spanking new 1200 Sport

Jim Barron at Rose Farm Classics chimed in.  “Why don’t you buy a new one and start a relationship with something that nobody else has ridden first?” he thoughtfully pitched.  I know Jim wanted to sell me a bike, and he knew which one it was that I had spotted over the espresso machine in his showroom. I trust Jim, but, well, he’s there to sell bikes, too.

I started doing the math. A Guzzi has a two-year warranty.  My financial outlay on a new bike will be minimal.  I already have my “vintage” Guzzi, which isn’t a money-pit but does require a lot of maintenance to keep it in tip-top shape.  Guzzi’s don’t depreciate much, so, if I buy it right, I won’t be out much in three years or so if I want to sell it then.  So I’m already sold.  Jim knew it before I did. Continue reading I liked it so much I Bought my Own!

Links to Moto Guzzi V7 Classic Reviews

V7 Classic on Roman Streets
V7 Classic on Roman Streets

I spent some time on the phone with Jim Barron at Rose Farm Classics yesterday.  I’m thinking about buying a bike from him right now (unless the right V7 Sport falls into my lap, which just doesn’t happen), and the subject turned around to the V7 Classic.  I’ve yet to plant my butt on one and ride it, but I know that will be happening in the future.

As we talked about the V7, we also talked about how much we liked Maxi Scooters.  The thing is, in Chicago, there are pot hole that will swallow you up.  I barely missed one last Saturday on Wacker that was more than 2 feet wide and at least as deep.  Had I hit that on the Eldorado I was riding, let alone a scooter, I do believe that would have made a spectacular mess.  Maxi-Scoots also aren’t getting any lighter, either.  Still love the scoots, and I’ve even looked at a couple recently for my jaunts around Oak Park.

So the question came up.  Maxi-Scoot or V7 Classic?  The Maxi-Scoot gives a lot of storage and weather protection, park-ability and style.  They are reliable, get great mileage and allow you to zoom just about anywhere you want, including freeways, with ease. How does it compare with the lightweight Guzzi?

The V7 has style all over it, since Guzzi basically pulled every classic goodie out of their refrigerator and made a perfect Dagwood Sandwich of style with this bike. Even the white color just fits it.  This bike is all style and all bike, without having a sinister bone in it’s body.

Is it reliable?  Reliability is a Guzzi hallmark.  I think there were a few years, pre-Piaggio, that might have been troubling, but I also believe that time is long past.  Even the latest recall on the Stelvio/Grisos was more for caution and getting things absolutely right for the customer, instead of fixing a potential disaster in the field.  A couple of the new V7 owners on the mailing lists that I subscribe to have had some niggling issues, but this bike is built on a well-evolved, solid platform.

I keep hearing that the V7 is “under-powered”.  My Eldorado has about the same amount with at least an extra hundred pounds to haul around.  I’m just buying that argument unless you’re comparing it to a 750cc hot-rod bike.  This bike doesn’t fill that role.  This bike is about enough of everything — a typical Guzzi with nothing to prove to anyone — the right-minded owner will bond with this bike completely.  It’s a great first bike, a great retro-bike, and I predict that it’s a great “Eastern City” bike, where there’s lots of stop-and-go, potholes, and openings that must be quickly exploited.

I have no dog in the hunt.  I haven’t ridden the V7 Classic yet.  I’ve been on a bunch of scooters, thanks to Piaggio, and I believe them to be superior products that are a blast to ride.  I think for me the V7 Classic would edge out the Maxi Scoot on three things:

  • I ride mostly with motorcyclists at the moment since I haven’t had a scoot in Chicago.
  • I take a lot of rides out in the wilderness.
  • I ride at night, and the potholes in this city come out of nowhere in the pitch.
  • Jim thinks the Guzzi is lighter than the biggest Maxis
  • Jim sells only Guzzi, and I’m pretty much of a completely biased homer in that department.
  • I would love a scooter, seriously love one, but I don’t have enough Motorcycles yet for the amount of money that I currently have to spend.  The sad fact is that if I had a scooter, I would probably ride it more than the bikes.  I’m just not ready to be so damned pragmatic in my life.

While I’m waiting for my V7 to test and ride around, I’ve been reading the reviews, and in doing so, I’ve decided to give out the links that I’ve found and share them.  Please feel free to comment with your experiences on the V7, good or bad,  if you have one and if you find more reviews feel free to add them to your comments:

(There’s a lot of UK in here, simply because the bike was available for almost a year in Europe before they were brought into the US).

Moto Guzi on Cycle World Radio

Cycle World Radio interviewed one of our favorite guzzisti, Steve Rossi, as well as the Brand Manager for the US, Rick Panettieri.  He discusses the factory shutdown last December as well as the new model line in wonderful detail.  I have new respect for Rick, he seems to really “get it” with the Guzzi brand.  Here’s the link to the broadcast:

http://feeds.radioamerica.org/CycleWorld/SHOWS/CycleWorld_Hr1.mp3

Steve Natt, the host, spent some time on a new Griso before going to air, and he talks about his experiences with it. I get a kick out of the amount of time they talk about the heads banging knees.  Just hasn’t happened to me on any of the Guzzis I’ve ridden, and they spend time talking about the torque impulses in turns.  Hmm…  I never notice the torque moving me around in the turns.  They do a very admirable job of explaining who the Guzzi Rider is, and what they are about.

There is also a nice quick blurb about the V7 Classic.  It’s now the best-selling Guzzi this year, with all Guzzi sales up 11%.  Nice news that.

Backup Bike Continued

Well, I have the ST2 on Craigslist.  The drama in my mind with respect to my “backup bike” continues.  I’ve been looking at the usual Guzzi suspects, the 1000s, SP, Brevas — even a V7 Sport or a Lodola.  The fact is, how and where I ride has changed dramatically since I moved to Chicago — gone are the 1000 mi weeks, week after week.  My commute is only about 15 miles round trip, and even with things closer here, there’s just no way that I’m going to rack up the miles that I had previously, which I don’t know if it is good or bad, it just is what it is.

One of the things that has been tickling me of late is the maxi-scoot.  The Eldo is just a great bike.  I love riding it, love everything about it.  Sheer joy on my face while I’m on it, so I’m imagining what another bike looks like parked next to it, and trying to play forward what the use for the second bike would be as the “new to me” wears off and I get up in the morning and decide what to ride that day.

I love the Piaggio Maxi-Scoots.  They’ve made me a better overall rider.  They are a serious blast to run around in, and are just as relaxing and utilitarian as anything I have ever been on, and just plain fun.

So I’m still ruminating and want to seek comments and opinions from anyone that cares.   Here’s my poll:

Feel free to chime in with a comment, too!  Thanks!

The Backup Bike.

I’m an avid reader and sometimes responder to the “Wild Guzzi” forums — one of the truly fun forums for Guzzi enthusiasts.  Thank God for my MacIntosh Mail client — I just add the RSS feed from the forums and can sift through them at my leisure.

A post came up recently asking people to name their “backup bikes” — it turned out that the average was three bikes total.  My response was:

“Ducati ST2.  It gets ridden about as much as the Eldorado, but I’m thinking about selling it and getting a 1200 Sport or Griso or maybe even a Paul Smart 1000 or???    Dunno.  The ST2 is as reliable as a sewing machine, fast, comfortable, big bags and a blast to drive.  I’m just not that ‘into’ it.”

I received a message back from one of the other members —

Gosh Dan,  I thought you’d have a Cal Vintage instead of a Griso or Stelvio…….After reading your report on the Cal Vin, I was ready to take a test ride and trade my Quota in.  I must of took you wrong, huh? — The Kid”

It’s actually killing me.  I think the Cal Vintage is the best bike that Guzzi Makes, but I have an Eldorado now.  I sat and thought long and hard about parting with the Eldo, but I just can’t do it.  The Vintage and the Eldo serve similar functionality, so I can’t justify to my wife to have two bikes that do “roughly” the same thing.  I also loved the 1200 Sport — another insanely wonderful bike, so my problems increase dramatically in deciding which way to move.

I’m not a dual-sport guy.  I’m actually having trouble getting “into” the looks of the Stelvio — I think the current range of dual-sports, led by KTM are the most butt-ugly bikes I’ve ever seen — the Stelvio isn’t really ugly, kind of like the Ducati Multistrada isn’t ugly, they both “challenge” my sense of what a bike is supposed to look like.  Still, I’ve talked to so many people that say the Stelvio is a truly great bike (like my Duc buddies rave about Multistradas) that it’s on my list to Review.

I ruminated for months before picking out a Guzzi to return to biking with, and I spent probably as much time picking out the “right” Eldo.  I’ll spend at least a few more months picking something else out — Since I’m new to Chicago, I’m really trying to understand how my riding habits, style and distances will change and pursue the bike to fit that role.  Guzzi’s got a ton of great bikes for different missions — I just need to get my arms around that. And yes, my ST2 is a tremendous bike, but it’s just a “friend with benefits” and not “someone I want to marry”.

If I had to pick only one bike from Guzzi — getting rid of the Eldo, and even throwing in some of the “great” older rides — I’d still pick the Cal Vintage.  It’s the best bike Guzzi’s [i]ever[/i] produced for the mission it’s intended to fulfill — an all around big bore bike that can handle city and highway, cruise with the hogs and then dust them in the twisties.  It’s safe, reliable and in surprisingly nimble in all conditions.

Oh hell, now I’m thinking about getting one again.  Damn you Guzzikid!

Gonna miss Wilfred…

I took the Eldo over to Mark at Moto Guzzi Classics before I moved out of California to get “everything” done to it. It was running crappy, needed new mufflers and I wanted to get a few odds and ends done so I could have a wonderful riding season when it began in Chicago. I didn’t want to have to deal with fixing the bike here along with the house purchase, move, etc.

Mark fixed everything including some bone-headed errors like loop rockers in T-3 heads (almost ate the pushrods, I SWEAR that I thought they were Tonti rockers!). He rebuilt my rebuilt carbs and took out all the O-rings that I didn’t need, straightened my bars that I didn’t realize were crooked, put on some shiny new Macs, and service the bike completely.

Sean and Mark had a few laughs over the heads that I had purchased — I don’t think that there were 10 decent threads on them, and some were SAE. I spent more on those heads than I would have if I had just manned-up and bought some performance ones straight off  his shelf. 

Live and learn. I’m gonna miss you, Wilfred.

How Old is the Average Guzzi Rider?

 

There’s been a lot of activity on the Wild Goose Chase forums about riders and their respective ages.  I thought I’d put a poll out and see what my readers are doing.  I’m going first — 47.

The poll is closed, but here are the results of a total pool of 124 participants:

here

  age group votes %  
41-55 53 42.74%
55+ 42 33.87%
31 – 40 24 19.35%
21 – 30 5 4.03%
< 21 0 0%
  total:  124    

A Trip to Rose Farm Classics

Jim Barron of Rose Farm Classics
Jim Barron of Rose Farm Classics

Just a few weeks after my arrival in Chicago, I received an email invitation from Jim Barron, owner of Rose Farm Classics, one of the Moto Guzzi Dealers in the Chicago area.

Man, I needed some conversation. Being away from “home”, and my family two time zones away there is practically nothing really to break the monotony when I’m not working.  Any activity that didn’t involve watching TV, eating, drinking or dealing with real estate agents was more than welcome.  Dudes with Moto Guzzis, wrenches, compressors and associated “man-bling” and the accompanying manspeak is definitely needed.

I decided that as soon I got a break in the action and needed a Guzzi fix, I’d make the trek out to Woodstock, and see what his operation was all about.  After surfing his website, I got the true Guzzisti vibe– a real show room with a wide selection of new bikes, a full service department and a real clean operation.  Now, I just knew I was going to like him.

Continue reading A Trip to Rose Farm Classics