1,800-Mile 1990 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy

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This 1990 Honda GB500 shows just 1,842 miles and remained with its original owner until 2000. It was acquired by the seller from its second owner two years ago and has been ridden 300 miles since. The GB500 was styled as a tribute to the traditional English TT racers of the 1950s and 60s, and it features a 498cc single-cylinder paired with a 5-speed transmission. The most recent service was an oil and filter change performed two years ago by the seller. This example is now being offered with the factory tool kit and books, as well as a clean Kentucky title. Inspired by mid-century TT bikes and cafe racers, the GB500 features a large single cylinder engine, Honda black green bodywork with gold pin striping, a solo seat, clip on handlebars, and a faux megaphone exhaust. The seller states that the paint and chrome are original, though the tires have aged and should be replaced. The suspension consists of twin telescopic forks at the front and twin shocks at the rear with adjustable pre-load. Electric start is standard, but the kick starter is also retained as both a secondary method of starting and to compliment the styling. This US-market GB500 has gauges with matte silver faces and minimal warning lights. The five-digit odometer shows just 1,842 miles and is believed to be accurate. The seller reports that the switch gear is original and all of the controls work correctly. The four-valve 498cc dry sump single produced 33 horsepower when new and is derived from the Honda XR500 dirt bike. The dual-port head is fed by a single 42mm Keihin carburetor and has a chrome two-into-one exhaust pipe. The oil tank is located under the seat and is fed by braided steel lines. The oil and filter were last changed when the seller acquired the bike two years ago. The original owner’s manual, service manual, and tool kit are included in the sale. No service records are provided, as both the seller and previous owner personally performed maintenance.

Refreshed Fastback: 1969 Norton Commando 750

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This 1969 Norton Commando 750 Fastback (chassis 130129) was originally purchased new in London by a US Air Force pilot before being exported to the States sometime after. The bike received a replacement frame before leaving its native England, and the seller notes quite a bit of more recent work including “going through” of the engine and gearbox, new carbs, lines, cables, suspension components, tires, tubes, and sorted, fully functional electrics. The tank sounds to retain its factory finish, and though far from a preserved original, the bike looks great and is said to be leak-free–a pretty big deal for any vintage British bike. Find it here on eBay in Prescott Valley, Arizona with reserve not met. Dark red over silver is a sharp looking combo, and sounds to be factory. Brightwork shows very well, while lenses, trim, and the seat all show minimal wear. Frame issues weren’t uncommon with 1968-build bikes, which may explain why this example has had its replaced. New fork tubes and seals were also fitted, along with new wheels, spokes, front fender, tires and tubes. The cockpit houses a trio of good looking Smiths gauges, more brightly polished chrome, and new cables and grips. The seat vinyl’s and pull handle look to be in good shape, and foot controls appear to be wearing newer rubber. 15 kilometers are what’s shown on the odometer, and we’re guessing it was reset sometime during the recent round of work. The 745cc twin looks detailed, with no signs of dirt or fluids anywhere. The seller mentions a few newer items including control cables, fuel lines, carbs, and a correct cloth-wrapped electrical harness. New isolastic motor mounts have also been installed, while an upgraded center stand replaced the factory model that was known to be another failure point. These early fastbacks aren’t seen too often these days, especially as nice as this one looks to be. Initial resistance to their elongated tail led to the more conventional roadster that followed, but we think they’ve aged really well.

40 CB160’s, 10 Benly 150’s & Friends: 1960’s Honda Hoard Sell-Off

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This unusual ad is offering more than 50 old Hondas for sale with prices starting at $300. Included among the hoard are “about 40” CB160’s, a few CL160’s, a CA160, and most interesting of all, around 10 CA95 Benly 150’s. Condition reportedly ranges from parts donor to decent and restorable with several “really nice” bikes at the top and most somewhere in the middle. Find them all here on Craigslist in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Reads most of the ad: “I am selling many CB160 Baby Hawks and have about 40. I have about 10 Benly 150’s, a couple of CL160’s and a CA160 also. Some starting at $300 cash only. There are about eight-nine strictly parts bikes, seven really nice, five-six very decent and restorable, and about 26 in the middle, some better than others.” The mildly sporting and somewhat advanced Benlys are particularly interesting, and are starting to become collectible. At the very least there’s enough parts here to keep the handful of really good bikes running for 400 years or so, and the seller openly prefers to sell several at a time.

Spanish Scrambler: 1976 Montesa Rapita 50

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This 1976 Montesa Rapita is a good looking 50 that was recently rebuilt into a cool scrambler-inspired bike using factory parts and a bit of mild but creative modification. Montesa enjoyed a fair amount of success in its Spanish home market and throughout Europe in the sixties and seventies, turning out enduro, street, and trials machines before a weak economy resulted in the marque being absorbed by Honda. The seller says this bike is fully functional and runs great, noting that the rebuild used all NOS parts. Find it here on eBay in Budapest, Hungary with a $3,800 BIN. The biggest visual departures over a stock Rapita are the deletion of fenders, addition of a riser bar, and meaty tires. The exhaust was also rerouted to a high-exit, scrambler type. The plastic tank has been left unrestored, and we like the worn-in look contrasted against the newly recovered seat and other polished items. Even the grips look like they could be the original items. The single gauge is a Veglia speedo, adorned with Montesa logo and simple numbering. A 50cc two-stroke single should give about 5 HP in stock form, and this one looks about as near to new as can likely be found. The casing and carb have been cleaned up well, and the highly polished expansion pipe is cool too. All hardware looks new, while the frame and associated parts have been painted flat black. 5,147 kilometers are shown on the odometer–not a big number, but this is quite a small displacement bike. Factory Rapitas were fully street-legal with required lighting, fenders, and a low-exit exhaust as shown in a period advertisement below. Even with its little 50cc single, this bike looks like it would be a blast around a big property, or as an in-town runabout. An included link to the builder’s page shows a number of other cool and unique projects undertaken by their shop.

Velvet Violet: Sharp 1993 BMW R100GS

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This 1993 BMW R100GS (VIN WB1048805P0231216) is said to remain almost entirely original apart from a correct NOS seat which isn’t currently fitted–it is however included with several other OEM parts that have been replaced with well-judged aftermarket items. The seller spent last winter bringing technicals up to par with nicely preserved cosmetics, with work including rebuilt carbs, fitment of a new neutral switch, pushrod tube seals, oil pan gasket and more. It’s now said to be fully functional and sounds like a pleasure to ride. Find it here on eBay in Fort Collins, Colorado with reserve not met. Special thanks to BaT reader Michael W. for this submission. The seller says that this purple and yellow color scheme was called “Velvet Violet” (Samtviolett in German), and adds that few were thus equipped. It’s about as 90’s a look as can be imaged, but dated or not we dig it. Paint is said to be in 9.5 out of 10 condition, factory luggage is said to have no cracks or scratches, and overall the bike does look very well preserved. Tires are reportedly newer with around 200 miles use, and though the long rack and single seat look is cool, a correct purple and black NOS saddle is included. Other changes include fitment of billet pegs, 20mm bar risers, Wunderlich shifter, and Migsel side stand. Says the seller: “All these items I can change back to stock in a matter of 30 minutes. I have all the original parts that came with the bike which will go to the new owner.” These include what looks like a fully stocked factory tool roll. Here’s a look at the cockpit, as well as the rare NOS seat. Gauge needles are said to be bounce-free, and the bike is also claimed to remain fully functional. A large windscreen is provided separately. Says the seller: “Everything else on the bike is original or correct OEM with most of the replaced parts from Max BMW. I have all receipts for my purchases. Some of the work that has been performed on this bike in the last 500 miles includes new pushrod tube seals, new BMW neutral switch, new oil pan gasket, carburetors rebuilt, engine completely tuned up, rear main seal and clutch were inspected and found to be in excellent condition, the splines which showed basically no wear were greased.”

1981 Moto Guzzi Le Mans CX100

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This 1981 Moto Guzzi Le Mans CX100 was acquired by the seller five years ago and modified as a custom Cafe Racer. It is powered by a 1000cc V-twin coupled to a 5 speed gearbox. It was torn down and rebuilt and now features polished alloy bodywork, clip on handlebars, Tarozzi rearsets, Marzochi shocks, Bitubo fork cartridges, 36mm Dell’Orto carburetors, and Ducati sourced Brembo brakes. The engine has been rebuilt with big valve heads, higher compression pistons, straight cut timing gears, and larger 36MM carbs. Now showing only 475 miles on the rebuild, it is offered with all build receipts and a clear Colorado title. The tank is an alloy replica of the original that the seller discovered under several layers of weathered paint, while the alloy tail section was custom formed by a craftsman in Germany. The seat is upholstered in a carbon fiber print vinyl. The wheels are stock 18″ Le Mans cast alloys. The seller mentions that the frame is painted satin black and was not modified to fit the custom alloy parts. The Le Mans CX100 was a US only model designed to replace the Mk1 850 Le Mans. Introduced in 1979, it used the milder 1000SP engine with a lower 9.2:1 compression ratio. The seller addressed this lack of power by adding higher compression pistons, big valve heads, straight cut timing gears, and replacing the 30mm Dell’Orto carbs with larger 36mm pumper units. Brembo Gold brakes with braided lines were sourced from a Ducati, replacing the original Moto Guzzi linked brakes. The suspension features Bitubo fork cartridges and Marzocchi rear shocks. Other custom touches include Bub ceramic coated Conti replica pipes, Bub high capacity oil pan with an external filter, and Tarozzi rearsets. The headlight bucket was sourced from a 1954 Puch with a veglia speedo and LED warning lights installed. Clip on handlebars with bar end mirrors were added and all of the original Moto Guzzi switch gear retained. All electronics have been relocated and are now hidden under the tank and a new wiring harness was constructed using modern ATC fuses. The odometer shows 475 miles added since the build was completed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzOcaqNIUi0 The seller has provided a walk around video as well as a cold start video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1hvWo62Fr8

1972 Norton 750 Combat Commando

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This 1972 Norton Combat Commando was acquired by the seller five years ago in stock condition from the son of the original owner. Dave Katz of Classic Bike Experience in Vermont was then commissioned to build it into a road-going tribute to Norton production racers. Work was completed two years ago and included the installation of authentic Dunstall body work. Powered by a 745cc parallel-twin coupled to a 4-speed gearbox, the bike was refurbished with an emphasis on preservation and reliability. Systems were renewed or rebuilt over a period of one year as detailed below, with the goal of creating a reliable weekend rider. Now showing 13,300 miles, this Norton is offered with all build receipts as well as a clean Vermont transferable registration. The wheels were re-laced with stainless steel spokes during the refresh, and new tires were also installed. The seller notes that the paint shows some age-related scratches and fading as well as a few stress cracks in the fiberglass bodywork. Turn signals and bar end mirrors were added for safety. All new wiring harnesses were fitted, while the forks and brakes were rebuilt. The 13,300 indicated miles are believed accurate by the seller. An aftermarket Alton electric start was fitted, though the original kick starter was also retained. All gaskets and seals were renewed, and bearings checked and replaced wherever needed. New shocks and suspension bushings were also installed along with NOS Amal carbs and Norton peashooter pipes. The build was completed two years ago by Classic Bike Experience in Vermont and is described as a renovation rather than a restoration, as the primary objective was reliability. All receipts related to the work performed are included in the sale. A short video can be seen below and shows a walk-around as well as the bike starting. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZOY-Q54gtY&feature=em-upload_owner

No Reserve: 1975 BMW R75/6

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This 1975 BMW R75/6 is a largely stock example which received some refurbishment work prior to current ownership. The motorcycle has been owned for a year by the seller, who purchased it from a local BMW dealership. The bike is powered by a 750cc horizontal air-cooled twin, and modifications include twin front disc brakes as well as Mikuni carburetors. This R75 is sold with a clean Texas title and the owner states he receives quite a bit of attention riding it. The fuel tank and fenders were reportedly repainted in brick red metallic with factory-style pinstriping. By 1975, rubber knee pads had replaced the chrome tank sides seen on the earlier models. Wire spoked wheels wear more modern tires, though the rear is showing some wear. A 140mph speedo is present and a stand-alone tach was offered for the first time on the /6. The five-digit odometer currently shows just over 14,500 miles. The two-place seat is newer item according to the seller, who has added approximately 200 miles during the last year and says the bike rides well without any issues. Power is from the 750cc version of BMW’s air-cooled horizontal twin which was originally rated at 50 horsepower. A top-end rebuild and piston ring replacement were reportedly carried out within the last two years and fueling is via Mikuni carburetors rather than the original Bing units. Both mufflers have been replaced and an electronic ignition was added in 2016. Shifting is via a 5-speed transmission which sends power rearward via a shaft rather than a chain. Dealer services within the last two years included replacement of a leaking camshaft seal as well as an oil change performed in 2016. Dual front disc brakes are reportedly from an R90S and stainless brake hoses have been added. The bike has not been registered for 2017. Records from the last two years of dealer service are included.

No Reserve: 1965 Honda CB160

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This 1965 Honda CB160 shows 23k miles and was modified into a cafe racer style in 2010. The seller and his father have owned the bike for the past six years. As a first-year model of the CB160, it is powered by a 161cc single-overhead cam four-stroke twin paired to a 4-speed manual transmission. The petcock was recently rebuilt, and additional modifications include a clubman bar, license plate bracket, kill switch, and updated charging system. It is titled in Georgia as a 1969 CB160 and is being offered for sale with no reserve. The tank, fenders, and chain guard were hydro-dipped, resulting in a carbon-fiber effect on the finish. According to the seller, this example maintained a stock appearance until it was modified into a cafe racer seven years ago. A clubman handlebar was added, and 23k miles are indicated on the odometer, with only 200 miles added by the seller. The speedometer is not currently functioning, which the seller believes is due to a faulty speedometer cable. The 161cc four-stroke was serviced in December at Sport Cycle in Savannah, Georgia and according to the seller makes good torque through all four gears. The petcock was rebuilt, new gaskets were installed in the carburetors, and the charging system was updated with a unit from Rick’s Motorsports. The battery was also replaced. An ignition kill switch was added, and the seller notes that some idle adjustment is occasionally necessary. A couple service records are included in the sale, with prior history largely unknown. Motorcycles imported to Florida in the 1960s were reportedly not issued titles until 1969, and this example is titled as a 1969 CB160.

No Reserve: 1955 Maico Typhoon

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This 1955 Maico Typhoon is a rare 395cc two-stroke example that was purchased out of the Mike Doyle Museum Collection six months ago. It remains largely original and features a leading-link front end and distinct blue fairings. Recent service includes a new set of tires, cables, carburetor cleaning, and a fresh battery. It was shown at the Quail Motorcycle Gathering earlier this year and has been ridden about 25 miles by the seller. This Maico is now being offered with a clean California title in the seller’s name. The Maisch brothers founded the Ulrich Maisch & Co near Stuttgart, Germany in 1926. Motorcycle production began in 1931 with small displacement two-stroke models. The Typhoon was introduced in 1953 with a 349cc and later a 395cc motor, it was the largest and most innovative machine in their lineup at the time. The streamlined body features a rear fairing, red vinyl seat, chrome tank sides, and yellow welting. The stylized nose includes a leading-link front end with a valanced fender and an integrated drum brake. Power comes from a 395cc two-stroke parallel twin, which was rated at 22.5hp when new and features a 4-speed manual transmission. The engine is a stressed member of the frame and joined by a single top tube and down tube. Carburetors are hidden beneath the bodywork and have been recently serviced. The Duplex drive chain runs in a fully enclosed cast-aluminum swingarm and replacement tires have been installed on the shouldered aluminum rims by the seller within the past six months. Instrumentation is limited to a speedometer centered on the headlight bucket. 59k kilometers (~37k miles) are shown on the odometer. A hand-pump is affixed to the bottom of the hinged seat with storage underneath.