1965 Ducati Diana Mark 3

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This 1965 Ducati Diana Mark 3 has been ridden only 10 miles over 29 years with the seller, who has used it primarily for display. The bike is powered by a 250cc single-cylinder with a 5-speed transmission. The seller purchased it from a former Ducati dealer with a reported rebuilt engine, and recently changed the oil, replaced the spark plug, and cleaned the points. This Mark 3 is sold with a factory tool kit, owners manuals, and a clean Tennessee title in the seller’s name. The Mark 3 weighed only 250 pounds and produced 30 horsepower new, making it the fastest 250cc street bike available when new. A period Cycle World test found that the Mark 3 was capable of a standing quarter mile time of 16.5 seconds at 79.5mph with a top speed of 104mph –faster than the contemporary Yamaha TD1 race bike. The paint is reported to be original with age related chips and scratches. The gas tank is an older repaint of good quality with clean internals, but the seller also has a tank with original paint and will offer the buyer a choice between the two. Minor surface rust can be found on the rear fender tip and the chrome shows signs of pitting. The front fender and tool box logos are also faded. The early production Mark 3 featured smaller scrambler style fenders with 18 inch wheels. The seller mentions that it wears older race tires that should be replaced if returned to the road. The Veglia tachometer was a unique feature of the Diana Mark 3 and had an 8500 rpm redline. 7730 miles are shown on the odometer but can not be verified as correct. The number plate with flyscreen is a period accessory. Factory clip-ons wear period Grand Touring grips, and all controls are reported to work well. Power comes from a matching numbers 250cc bevel-drive 4-stroke single cylinder mated to a 5-speed manual gearbox. The engine is believed to have been rebuilt several years ago by the former owner, who was a Ducati dealer. Features include magneto ignition, factory rear set foot-pegs, and a megaphone exhaust. The bike was in storage for several years before the seller changed the oil, replaced the spark plug, and cleaned the points. The factory tool roll is included as well as a service manual, and the original owner’s manuals. No service receipts are available as the seller has personally performed all necessary maintenance. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yuP0XNmRnAQ The seller has added a video to illustrate the running condition. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Pl_9R0Cw50

Unusual Trials/Street Bike: 1987 Honda Reflex TLR 200

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This 1987 Honda Reflex TLR 200 (VIN JH2MD0902HK102965) is an interesting and fairly unusual trials/street hybrid, and as this model was exported here to the US for just 1986 (1987 examples like this one were simply leftovers), they now seem to be pretty rare as well. Condition looks good, and the seller claims a modest ~1,500 miles as well as no rust in the tank, full functionality, good tires, a new spark plug, oil, fork seals, chain tensioner pad and a cleaned and adjusted carb. Find it here on eBay in Colorado Springs, Colorado with reserve not met. The bike’s geometry seems to be a bit more relaxed than a full-on competition machine, but should make it a lot more comfortable on the street. The brightly painted frame contrasts well against a clean white tank and fender plastics, none of which appear to harbor any signs of abuse or wear apart from a couple scratches on the headlamp fairing. The seat, grips and lenses also look nice, and knobbly tires have plenty of tread remaining, though their age is unknown. The instrument cluster shows some fading on the gauge face and warning light panel, but all the lights sound to be operational. The speedo numbers peak at 75 MPH, but that may be a tad optimistic with a 170lb. rider aboard. 1,557 miles are seen on the odometer and are reportedly correct. A 194cc four-stroke single is nestled in the frame, and sends 13.5 HP rearward through a 6-speed gearbox. The seller mentions a recent servicing that included new oil, filters and a spark plug, along with a carb adjustment, new fork seals and chain tensioner pad. There are no obvious signs of fluid leaks, and engine’s paint has held up well too. Small dual-purpose bikes are loads of fun, and this one’s rarity and unusual trials/street setup makes it especially intriguing.

1969 Greeves Ranger

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This 1969 Greeves Ranger is a refurbished example that shows 1,145 miles. The seller acquired it ten years ago out of basement storage, where it is said to have been kept for 35 years. It was then brought to Greeves expert, Mark Sawicki for a major refurbishment and a few upgrades. Power comes from a 250cc Villiers air-cooled single with a four-speed manual gearbox, and the bike has been fitted with a rebuilt speedometer, re-wound magneto, taller gearing, and a custom luggage rack. This Ranger is now being offered in Bluffton, South Carolina with a documentation folder, service records, spares, and a clear New York State transferable registration. When the dual-sport craze took off in the mid-1960’s, the West Coast Importer for Greeves, Nick Nicholson, needed a competitive offering. He convinced Burt Greeves to make a version of his trials and motocross bike street-legal and sell them in the US. After some prototypes were assembled from standard frames, parts, and engines, the Ranger was developed with its unique sand-cast down tube, leading-link front end, and hollow swing arm with integrated drip-style chain oiler. For use in the Ranger, the 250cc Villiers two-stroke came equipped with a proprietary cast aluminum cylinder head, complete with a compression release. The four-speed manual gearbox was originally setup with “trials” gearing, which was reportedly good for around 40 mph. However, during the refurbishment, when the engine cases were split, an upgraded countershaft sprocket and associated parts were fitted to allow a top speed of around 55 mph. The original gearset is included with the sale. Other notable work included re-plating the hardware, installing new shocks, brake shoes, chain, sprockets, tires, and tubes, along with sending the ignition magneto to the UK for re-winding. The original headlight nacelle and tail lamp assembly were missing when the seller acquired the bikes. These items are shared with other BSA and Triumph models, and new reproductions have been sourced and installed. The Smiths speedometer has been rebuilt and is set to show the believed-accurate 1,145 miles, 153 of which have been added by the seller. The bike has been fitted with a few modifications, including a redesign of the kickstart lever, extending the front fender brace over the 21″ front wheel, and fabricating a luggage rack out of thicker tubing in the style of the original unit. Passenger pegs were not originally supplied but the gussets/mounts for them are part of the frame should the next owner wish to ride two-up. Extra plugs and a wrench are kept on the rear support. Spare parts and a set of Whitworth wrenches are also included with the sale. After the refurbishment was completed, the seller rode the bike on the USCRA’s Moto-Giro, and earlier this month entered it in the Hilton Head Concours d’Elegance, where it won the Palmetto Award. A brief video taken by the seller is shown below.

No Reserve: 1971 BMW R60/5

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This 1971 BMW R60/5 has been with the seller for five years and is equipped with a 600cc flat-twin and 4-speed manual gearbox. The previous owner was a close friend of the seller’s, who acquired the bike in stock configuration and modified it with a custom exhaust system, K&N air filters, Laverda handlebars, Corbin seat pan, Oshmo rear-set foot pegs, and aftermarket lighting. An oil change was performed a year ago, and this R60/5 is now being offered for sale at no reserve with a clean California title in the seller’s name. Equipped with an electric starter and telescopic forks, the /5 series are said to be the first line of BMW motorcycles manufactured entirely in Berlin. According to the seller, the engine, chassis, gas tank, and frame are original to the motorcycle. A small chip and some bubbling are noted on the gas tank from a substandard previous repair, and the tank has since been lined with Red-Kote and no further issues are reported by the seller. A custom exhaust system was added by the previous owner and the rear taillight and turn signal assembly were replaced with a single circular brake light. Some corrosion is present on the exhaust pipes, rear swing-arm hardware, Laverda cafe racer-style handle bars, and triple-clamp. The Corbin seat-pan was re-upholstered and Oshmo rear-set foot pegs were added. No gauges or instrumentation are present, and thus, true mileage is unknown. The seller estimates that under 1,500 miles were added during their five-year ownership. According to the seller, the carburetors leak fuel at times and a small oil leak is present under the engine body. A new side-mounted gel battery was fitted in an aftermarket battery assembly, and the previous owner installed K&N air filters. No service records are available, and most maintenance was personally performed by the seller during their ownership.

No Reserve: 1986 Honda Trail CT-110

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This 1986 Honda Trail CT-110 was purchased new in 1988 by the seller, who has added 415 miles to the small motorcycle while driving around the Westlake Village area of Southern California. Powered by a 105cc single cylinder 4-stroke engine that’s paired to a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission, the CT-110 has been serviced by the seller over the years and recently received an oil change. This example was part of the final year of production for the US market, and is now being offered with a clean California title in the seller’s name. The Monza Red paint wears Honda decals. A small side-mounted fuel tank reminiscent of a canteen holds just under one and a half gallons, and fuel consumption was rated at 140 mpg at 31 mph. The license plate shows it was last registered in California in 1990. The 105cc horizontally-mounted 4-stroke engine is an air-cooled single cylinder unit that features CDI ignition. The motor is paired to a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission that utilizes a centrifugal clutch. A dual-range subtransmission is activated by a foot lever that allows riders to select high and low ranges for different types of terrain. The simple electronics on the CT-110 are said to operate as they should and include a speedometer with high and low range shift points, lights, indicators, and horn. The 415 miles indicated on the odometer are considered accurate by the seller.

One-Owner 2016 Morgan 3 Wheeler

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This 2016 Morgan 3 Wheeler was purchased new by the seller at Morgan Mid-Atlantic in August 2016 and has since been driven just under 1,500 miles in fair weather. Finished in Sport Red with a matching cowl over a black interior, the car has been fitted with heated seats, a Brooklands quick-release steering wheel, full windscreen, aluminum dash fascia, and more. It has been stored indoors when not in use and remains under a 30-month manufacturer warranty, valid until February 2019. Power comes from a 1,989cc S&S V-twin, which is mated to a five-speed manual gearbox sourced from a Miata. As a 2016 model, it features a revised chassis, steering system, Centa drive, and bevel box, updates which were introduced for the 2014 model year. This 3 Wheeler is now being offered with a mohair tonneau cover, service records from new, leatehr-bound build file, factory car cover, and a clear Pennsylvania title in the seller’s name. The aluminum body is finished in Sport Red with a matching cowl and black fenders. Stainless headlights  and chrome side mirrors come fitted, and the exhaust system features a pair of polished side-pipes. Wind coverage is provided by a single cabin-width screen, and a storage compartment is present in the rear portion of the body. A set of 2-eared wheel nuts have been installed by the seller, and a soft-face mallet is included along with the original hex-shaped wheel nuts. Other additions include a center rearview mirror, front badge bar, and a set of Union Jack badges. Trimmed in black upholstery with red stitching, the left-hand drive cockpit features heated seats, Coco mats, and leather storage pockets. A Brooklands quick-release steering wheel has been installed in place of the original unit, which is included with the sale. Engine-turned aluminum fascias have been installed on the dash, and aviation-style speedometer and tachometer come fitted from new. Less than 1,500 miles are shown on the odometer. The original V-twin Morgan 3 Wheelers were powered by an engine from J.A Prestwich, Matchless, or Blackburne. The modern version utilizes a 1989cc fuel-injected V-Twin from S&S Cycle mated to a five-speed manual gearbox with reverse. 2014 and newer models utilize Morgan’s Urban Cooling Kit to help keep temperatures down at low speeds, and the seller has added a chrome air filter cover from S&S. It has undergone one dealer service, in April 2017 at which point a fluid change and minor leak repair were performed. The battery has been wired for a tender. Employees at Morgan’s Malvern plant signed the inside of the rear compartment cover before it left the assembly line, and a leather-bound build file compiled by the factory is included with the sale.

No Reserve: 1971 BSA 650 Lightning A65 Project

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This 1971 BSA A65 Lightning is a non-running example that was purchased new at Cycle World of Toronto on May 24, 1972. It was acquired by the seller in 2014 as a project that had been disassembled by its original owner in 1979. The motorcycle has since been re-assembled by the seller, though some outstanding needs remain and the 654cc OHV parallel-twin engine has not been started. It is equipped with a 4-speed manual gearbox and is now being offered for sale at no reserve with some receipts from the original owner, a new battery, and a clean Ontario title in the seller’s name. The Lightning was built in Birmingham and designed largely for export to the North American market. This example comes from the end of BSA production. The seller states that the component missing prior to re-assembly was the main kickstand spring. The bike retains its Dove Grey frame, and a bracket has been welded onto the right pipe of the dual chrome exhaust system. Some blemishes in the finish of the tank and peeling of the BSA emblem are noted. Instrumentation is straightforward and includes a Smiths speedometer and tachometer, with 8,688 miles indicated on the odometer. A new battery is included in the sale. The 654cc overhead-valve parallel twin is reportedly original and was factory-rated at 53 horsepower when new. The seller has not attempted to start the bike, and notes that the compression is low on one side. The carburetors were cleaned but will require further adjustment. Outstanding mechanical needs include electrical sorting, air intake boots, and installation of fuel lines. Receipts from the original owner indicate that the bike was last serviced in 1979. Additional images in the gallery depict the seller’s re-assembly of the motorcycle.

Twice Restored Featherbed: 1960 Norton Dominator 99

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This 1960 Norton Dominator 99 is a very attractive example that’s been ridden a fair amount but has also seen two restorations along the way, the most recent back in 2011. These 99’s are arguably the most desirable of the Dominator line, combining Norton’s famous (and at the time, world-class) Featherbed frame with the largest available 597cc parallel twin, and this one comes with known ownership history as well as documentation dating to new. Find it here on mobile.de in Rosengarten, Germany for 9k euros (-$10,700 USD today). Inky black paint shows very well with no obvious flaws, and the various polished steel and chrome pieces look equally as nice. Cabling, hoses, and hardware seem like they may be newer, and there’s no sign of surface corrosion anywhere that we can see. A set of Smiths gauges are found mounted in the headlight fairing, and there’s 33,485 kilometers visible on the odometer. The 697cc vertical twin utilized alloy heads and a higher compression setup that bumped power up to 31 horses. The cleanliness of the engine casing and only a slight discoloring of the exhaust tubes suggest that the bike hasn’t been ridden much since the last restoration. These Featherbed frames were constructed by Reynolds, and provided excellent rigidity along with a lighter weight than pretty much anyone else in the industry at the time–as such it was at one time very popular to put other manufacturer’s engines in to Featherbeds, making for some very interesting hybrids. That said, we’re glad that this one retains its original engine and spec, and hope that it still does following an eventual third restoration as well.

No Reserve: 1993 Harley-Davidson FLSTC Heritage Softail Classic

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This 1993 Harley-Davidson FLSTC Heritage Softail Classic was ordered new by the selling dealer’s father. As the former owner of a motorcycle chrome parts business, the seller’s father modified this example with a number of aftermarket Harley-Davidson parts. The seller acquired the bike following his father’s passing five years ago and has only added approximately five miles since. Power comes from a 1,340cc Evolution V-twin paired to a 5-speed gearbox, and service in 2014 included a new battery, intake manifold seal, and fluids. This Harley-Davidson is now being offered at no reserve with a clean Florida title. The tanks and fenders are said to retain their original Vivid Black finish with pin-stripe accents. The seller notes the addition of numerous aftermarket chrome items by his father, with some light surface rust reported on some of the chrome. 16” wire-spoke wheels are wrapped in Dunlop tires from 2007 which the seller recommends replacing prior to use. Studded saddle bags and matching backrests were added. A period-car phone is fitted on the handlebars along with a bag and coin holder. A CB walkie talkie, gloves, sunglasses, and motorcycle cover are included in the sale. The 120 mph speedometer shows 25,977 miles, which are believed accurate by the seller. Only five miles have been added in the last five years. A cracked oil pressure gauge lens will reportedly be replaced for the sale. Power comes from an air-cooled, 45-degree 1,340cc Evolution V-twin mated to a 5-speed gearbox. Equipped with a single four-lobe gear-driven camshaft, the Evolution was used in a number of Harley-Davidson models during its 15-year production run. A receipt from Gator Harley-Davidson of Leesburg, Florida in December 2014 is viewable in the gallery. Work performed at that time included new fluids, spark plugs, battery, and seals. A walk-around and start-up video can be seen below.

No Reserve: 1957 Zundapp KS601 EL

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This Zundapp motorcycle appears to be a 1957 KS601 “Elastic” model with a 597cc boxer twin and 4-speed transmission. Built in post-war Germany, the relatively powerful engine and heavy-duty construction made these bikes well-suited to endurance or sidecar duty. Approximately 5,000 were produced including the US-only Elastic model, which was updated with more power and a different rear frame design to accommodate a revised rear suspension. Just 200 Elastics were reportedly built during late KS601 production, and this example has spent eight years in the seller’s Indiana collection. Basic KS601 models were typically finished in a pale green which leant the series its “Green Elephant” moniker. The Elastic model could be had in a number of colors, and the original hue of this example remains unconfirmed. Current black paint is shown up close in a number of photos below along with brightwork, badging, and a small tear in the right knee pad. A more modern two-place seat has replaced the bulky factory single-piece item, and a handful of trim pieces are missing. The taillight, rear shocks, and exhaust system also appear to be aftermarket replacements. Tires, brakes, and cables are all said to remain in good condition and all accessories function properly according to the seller. Just under 17k miles are shown on the 5-digit odometer. The 597cc boxer-twin produced 34 horsepower in Elastic trim. Fuel petcocks and 25mm Bing carburetors have recently been cleaned, and the fuel tank looks good inside according to the seller. General maintenance has been carried out by the collection’s mechanic over the past eight years. A 4-speed duplex chain driven transmission sends power to the rear wheel via a driveshaft rather than a chain. Suspension consists of a telescopic fork up front, while the Elastic model got a swing-arm setup to replace the plunger-style rear end of the basic KS601. Both wheels are equipped with drum brakes. The collection is managed under a dealer license and the sale includes a clean Arkansas title for reassignment to the new owner. The motorcycle is listed as a 1951 KS601 on the title, though its frame number 555255 appears to identify it as a 1957 KS601 EL.