No Reserve: 2007 Jack Pine Triumph Scrambler

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This 2007 Triumph Scrambler was customized by Hammarhead Industries in 2011 and turned into one of their Jack Pine bikes. The treatment consisted of matte black paint, removal of the oil cooler, shortening the rear frame loop by 4 inches, a reworked seat unit, adding Works Performance fork springs with twin shocks, and lightening the motorcycle down to about 450 pounds dry. The seller purchased this bike in 2012 and has added rear passenger pegs and high-rise handle bars. This Scrambler is now being offered at no reserve with service records since 2012 and a clean California title in the seller’s name. This Scrambler was produced in September 2006 as a 2007 model and was sold new in California. The Jack Pine conversion was meant to resemble some of the minimalist motorbikes produced during the 1950s and 1960s which were made famous by stars such as Steve McQueen. The speedometer/odometer has been removed in addition to several other components, giving the bike a purposeful look. The seller lists current flaws as some road rash on the left-rear shock adjuster, various small nicks and chips, dry/cracking grips, and rubber air filter mounts that need replacement. The rear indicators are currently zip-tied in place. The seller estimates they have added  about 550 miles. This bike features an 865cc engine with a sequential transmission which have received proactive maintenance during the seller’s ownership. Service records since 2012 are included with the sale and the most recent service was carried out six months ago–the bike has been driven just two miles since. An article from Cycle World in 2011 details the Jack Pine Scrambler, while a detailed interview by Peter Egan profiles Hammarhead’s founder and the philosophy behind this model below:

Globetrotting Battletwin: 1989 Buell RR 1200

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This 1989 Buell RR 1200 is an evolution of the earlier RR 1000 Battletwin, the make’s first street bike which itself was based on a racer which became redundant when the AMA dropped Formula One in 1986. In standard Buell practice the bike utilizes an in-house developed trellis frame with motivation delivered by a Harley-Davdison V-twin, in this case a 68 HP 1203cc Evo unit. These were interesting, limited-production bikes, and this one’s said to have just 567 miles from new. It reportedly benefits from a full recommissioning performed a year ago, and is now said to be in fully functional condition. Find it here on eBay in Grants Pass, Oregon with no reserve. Special thanks to BaT reader Boris for this submission. The seller admits to “some small scratches and touch-ups,” but insists that overall the bike remains in very nice condition. The bike has very few miles, but has bounced around the globe quite a bit: “This bike was sold new by Warr’s Harley-Davidson in London, England to a prominent member of the Buell Owner’s Group. It consequently was brought back to the US to be sold by Bonhams at an auction in California and went to Australia from there.” Styling is clearly of its time, but it still looks cool to our eyes, and it’s worth noting that aerodynamics were good enough that a modified example touched nearly 191 MPH at Bonneville in 1991, a class land speed record. Mechanical details are limited, but the seller notes a recommissioning effort dating back 12 months, adding that the bike is now fully functional. The blackened exhaust pipes and tattered wrap may suggest higher mileage, but regardless the bike remains a rare and interesting sight.

112K Miles & Cool Period Upgrades: 1972 BMW R75/5

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This 1972 BMW R75/5 (serial 2986620) has reportedly traveled a remarkable 112k miles over the past four-and-a-half decades, and though it wears the battle scars to prove it, the bike sounds like it’s been very well kept and the seller says they wouldn’t hesitate to ride it cross-country. Lots of cool period mods include a nine-gallon Heinrich tank, low bars, headlight-mounted mirrors, an upgraded side-stand and more. Around 54k miles ago the engine was rebuilt by well-regarded RPM Cycles of Ventura, with work including fitment of an 840cc big-bore kit, lightened flywheel and more. A gearbox rebuild is noted as well, along with more recent routine maintenance. Says the seller: “Don’t let the miles scare you, this bike has received constant maintenance and proper attention and is ready for another 112,000 miles!” Find it here on eBay in Mount Kisco, New York with an $8,500 BIN. From the ad: “This my Monza Blue R75/5 that’s been used but never abused. It’s traveled approximately 112,000 miles across the continent, so it’s accumulated some bruises, some paint touch-ups, faded frame paint, some surface corrosion, a few chips and dings along the way. The tank has a three-inch long shallow depression on the throttle side as a result of a tip-over. A paintless dent removal pro can likely pop it out, but I left it alone as a yet another reminder of its history… and of my stupidity.” Continued from the seller’s writeup: “So it has a worn look about it, but it wears it well. That said, it’s always been lovingly maintained, as evidenced by a thick folder of maintenance and repair receipts dating back to 1981, indicating that no expense was spared in keeping this bike running perfectly. As you can see in the photos, it’s not a show queen, but it’s quite an eye catcher, and it runs as good today as any airhead that I’ve ever owned.” Low bars, the big tank, and a headlight guard sprouting twin mirrors all make for a fantastic looking bike. Again from the seller: “At about 58,000 milesbRPM Motorcycles went through the bottom end of the engine replacing the crank bearings, and treating it to an 840cc big-bore kit. They also lightened the flywheel and performed a few other reliability tricks that helped owner Reg Pridmore win the AMA Superbike Championship. The transmission was gone through as well. After a move, BMW of Marin, San Rafael, Ca performed most of it’s routine maintenance, then a few other indie BMW shops, until the bike recently moved to the east coast. The bike went through MAX BMW’s shop last year for a checkup and a thorough service. It received new tires, a new battery, a tuneup and fluid change, trans input shaft spline lube, rear drive splines, charging system test (no issues), fork rebuild, steering head bearings, carb rebuild, new brakes, carb synch and other maintenance service to get it in tip top shape.” One more time from the ad: “The bike starts on command and does not smoke, does not burn any oil, shifts extremely smoothly, stops, turns and handles like a brand-new airhead. All electrical components, lights, charging system, etc. work as they should.”

Roger Moore Approved: 1978 Bede Pulse

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This 1978 Bede Pulse (also known as the BD-200, Autocycle or LiteStar) (chassis GL1E4051111) is one of a surprisingly large ~360 production run. Brainchild of aeronautical engineer and experimental jet kit pioneer, these frequently four-cylinder Honda Goldwing powered cars bear a strong family resemblance to the Bede BD-5J as seen in the opening scene of Octopussy. The seller says this one’s in great condition and kept on a battery tender in their hangar, and appropriately enough photos appear to have been taken at a small municipal airport. The car is further claimed to start on the first crank, and there’s no reason to doubt claims that it’s always a hit at car shows. Find it here on eBay in Shingle Springs, California with no reserve. Special thanks to BaT reader Jake F. for this submission. The car is essentially a stretched early Goldwing, with the drive wheel at the rear and steering at the front–“wing” pods are home to stabilizing outriggers. The seller says it’s in excellent condition, and photos do appear to show a well kept vehicle. This view from the back helps to better visualize the car’s wheel layout, as well as its relatively wide cabin. A few different versions appear to have been made, but we’re pretty sure the tail wing is a custom add-on. NACA ducts were normal production items however, and we like the simple red and white striped paint scheme seen on this example. No engine bay shots are provided, but beneath the slide-back canopy the cabin (cockpit?) appears to be in nice shape. There should be a second seat behind the driver, and instrumentation looks surprisingly comprehensive (as well as Goldwing-sourced). This video reportedly shows a 400cc Yamaha (or 600cc if the Seca II donor bike is identified correctly) powered example previously owned by legendary Big Daddy Don Garlits, and we think it actually looks like a lot of fun.

No Reserve: 1970 Honda CT70H

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This 1970 Honda CT70H is an early production bike with an April build date and was purchased by the seller three years ago after it was stored by the previous owner. In 2015 the pressed-steel frame repainted and the 72cc engine was rebuilt. The transmission is a 4-speed manual, and the bike has been ridden roughly 100 miles since work was completed. It is sold with a bill of sale only and is located in Richardson, Texas. The seller claims roughly 90% of the parts used in the restoration were either original to the bike or were Honda parts. The seat, buddy pegs, and miscellaneous bolts are aftermarket and the original tool kit is missing. No notable wear is visible on the seat, trim, or chrome and the bike features factory model and warning labels in their respective places. The bike was stripped to bare metal and the pressed-steel “T-bone” frame was repainted the factory Candy Emerald Green. It has been ridden about 100 miles since the restoration, including some neighborhood and parade use. The paint presents well, though some rock chips are present. 4,205 miles are shown on the odometer and thought to be accurate. The 72cc engine is believed to be original and was frozen when the bike was removed from storage. It was taken apart and rebuilt during the restoration process and is said to run well. No issues have been noted with the 4-speed transmission and manual clutch. The carburetor and exhaust are aftermarket, although the seller notes that the factory Honda carburetor has been rebuilt and is included in the sale. The bike received an oil change one month ago in preparation for sale. The serial number on the bike is 108248 and the serial number on the engine is 107926, both of which are consistent with the build date.

No Reserve: 1981 Honda C70 Passport

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This 1981 Honda C70 Passport is the US-market version of Honda’s long-lived Super Cub, which was first produced in 1958. This example is powered by a 70cc four-stroke single and features electric start and a 3-speed semi-automatic transmission. The previous owner purchased it from an older couple who had stored it in their garage and returned it to running condition with a carburetor adjustment, fresh fuel, new battery, and new bulbs. The seller recently acquired the bike and notes that apart from a few themed decals, it is unmodified. This Passport is sold with a clean California title in the seller’s name. Due to a trademark conflict with the Piper aircraft company, Super Cubs were marketed as the Passport in the United States. The seller states that the bike has all original paint, and all of the correct decals and badges appear to be intact. Themed decals are affixed to the side panels, but these are said to be the only non-stock items on the bike. The standard black vinyl seat appears to be in good condition, and the bike includes a grab handle on the seat and secondary pegs. The instrumentation is the correct all-in-one unit mounted in the handlebar faring. Some controls are cast aluminum, and the painted, embossed labels for the turn signals, lights, starter and kill switch are mostly intact. 2,240 miles are shown. Power comes from a 70cc four-stroke single producing about 6 horsepower. The engine is paired to a 3-speed semi-automatic transmission with a centrifugal clutch. The previous owner serviced the bike, including a carburetor adjustment, fresh battery, and new bulbs. The seller states that the bike is ready for use, with rubber components in good condition. A cold start video is attached below.

Street Legal Enduro: 467-Mile 1985 Montesa 348 Trail

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This 1985 Montesa 348 Trail (serial 51M55615) was used sparingly as a dealer demo in Arizona before being transferred to private collections and subsequently stored. It’s never been titled, and spent the last nine years in climate controlled storage where it was properly prepped and kicked over on a monthly basis. The seller says it remains in original condition apart from the foam air filter, and we’re digging the street-legal Enduro vibe. Find it here on eBay in Pueblo, Colorado with a $4,500 BIN. The plastics look a bit faded, and the tank shows a few scratches commensurate with light use, but otherwise the bike looks pretty well preserved. Note the integrated fuel tank/saddle mount–a cool design touch. There’s a small factory skid plate, and teeny front drum brake. The vinyl seat and rubber grips still show well, and control cables and levers are just as well preserved. The seller notes that the lights aren’t currently hooked up, but that sounds to be the only issue. 751 kilometers are shown on the odometer. The 348cc single has a foam air filter fitted, but looks to remain entirely stock otherwise. The seller said it was properly prepped before being put into long-term storage, and a brief ride upon their purchase was said to confirm no issues. DA 6-speed transmission enabled a top speed of 70 MPH, but these punchy motors were known for good low to mid-range torque as per their Enduro design role.

1975 Moto Guzzi 1000

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This 1975 Moto Guzzi 1000 shows 40,741 miles and was bought by the seller in 1997 from a friend who bought it from the original owner. The 1000cc engine has an aftermarket camshaft and valvetrain along with other modifications and is said to run well. Power delivery comes through a 5-speed transmission and all work was done by Steve Seftel at Rootsman Restoration in Salt Lake City. The seller has all records from his time with the bike, and it is offered with a clear Utah title in the seller’s name. A Le Mans tank, Le Mans single seat, and fiberglass side panels were fitted. The seller has added Tomeselli clip-ons, Tomaselli rear sets, Tomaselli dual pull throttle, and a Tomaselli headlight mount. The black vinyl seat has no rips or cracking, but the powder coating has been rubbed off in spots near the rear of seat where the rear fender attaches. Other imperfections include peeling chrome on the headlight ring and the underside of the exhaust along with valve covers and valve cover guards that are scuffed. The wheels are not perfectly chromed and would benefit from a cleaning and rechroming at some point in the future. Some of the black painted parts have started to fade, but overall the paint is in good condition. The turn signals are not original or vintage and no side stand is attached, although the mount is still present. The brakes and suspension have been updated, including Guzzi-Specific Marzocchi Strada forks complete with triple trees. Marzocchi rear shocks, Marzocchi fork brace, and a steering stabilizer comprise the rest of the suspension upgrades. Remanufactured Brembo calipers are present, stainless braided brake lines were added and the linked braking is still operational. There is a minor oil weep and missing dust cap on one of the rear shocks. The 1000cc V-twin was rebuilt by Steve Seftel at Rootsman Restoration using new rings, bearings, and gaskets.  Modifications to the engine include a lightened flywheel, racing cam, heavy duty valves and springs, dual plug machined, ported, straight shot intake manifolds, 36mm Dellorto carbs, electronic dyno coil, and a Bub shorty exhaust. The bike had a major service last year including overhauled carbs, service on all cables, all oils changed, a flushed and cleaned fuel tank, and a new battery. A startup and walkaround video has been provided by the seller. The bike is said to run very well with the seller adding about 10,000 miles during his ownership. No issues are noted with the 5-speed transmission, but there is a small resting pin missing on the speedometer. Minor oil weeps are present on the engine and the case guards seen in some photos have been removed. All records from the current owner are included with the sale, as is an award from the 6th Annual Bonneville Vintage GP motorcycle show in 2011 where the bike was awarded best European Rider by Motorcycle Classics.

1,800-Mile 1990 Honda GB500 Tourist Trophy

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This 1990 Honda GB500 shows just 1,842 miles and remained with its original owner until 2000. It was acquired by the seller from its second owner two years ago and has been ridden 300 miles since. The GB500 was styled as a tribute to the traditional English TT racers of the 1950s and 60s, and it features a 498cc single-cylinder paired with a 5-speed transmission. The most recent service was an oil and filter change performed two years ago by the seller. This example is now being offered with the factory tool kit and books, as well as a clean Kentucky title. Inspired by mid-century TT bikes and cafe racers, the GB500 features a large single cylinder engine, Honda black green bodywork with gold pin striping, a solo seat, clip on handlebars, and a faux megaphone exhaust. The seller states that the paint and chrome are original, though the tires have aged and should be replaced. The suspension consists of twin telescopic forks at the front and twin shocks at the rear with adjustable pre-load. Electric start is standard, but the kick starter is also retained as both a secondary method of starting and to compliment the styling. This US-market GB500 has gauges with matte silver faces and minimal warning lights. The five-digit odometer shows just 1,842 miles and is believed to be accurate. The seller reports that the switch gear is original and all of the controls work correctly. The four-valve 498cc dry sump single produced 33 horsepower when new and is derived from the Honda XR500 dirt bike. The dual-port head is fed by a single 42mm Keihin carburetor and has a chrome two-into-one exhaust pipe. The oil tank is located under the seat and is fed by braided steel lines. The oil and filter were last changed when the seller acquired the bike two years ago. The original owner’s manual, service manual, and tool kit are included in the sale. No service records are provided, as both the seller and previous owner personally performed maintenance.

Refreshed Fastback: 1969 Norton Commando 750

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This 1969 Norton Commando 750 Fastback (chassis 130129) was originally purchased new in London by a US Air Force pilot before being exported to the States sometime after. The bike received a replacement frame before leaving its native England, and the seller notes quite a bit of more recent work including “going through” of the engine and gearbox, new carbs, lines, cables, suspension components, tires, tubes, and sorted, fully functional electrics. The tank sounds to retain its factory finish, and though far from a preserved original, the bike looks great and is said to be leak-free–a pretty big deal for any vintage British bike. Find it here on eBay in Prescott Valley, Arizona with reserve not met. Dark red over silver is a sharp looking combo, and sounds to be factory. Brightwork shows very well, while lenses, trim, and the seat all show minimal wear. Frame issues weren’t uncommon with 1968-build bikes, which may explain why this example has had its replaced. New fork tubes and seals were also fitted, along with new wheels, spokes, front fender, tires and tubes. The cockpit houses a trio of good looking Smiths gauges, more brightly polished chrome, and new cables and grips. The seat vinyl’s and pull handle look to be in good shape, and foot controls appear to be wearing newer rubber. 15 kilometers are what’s shown on the odometer, and we’re guessing it was reset sometime during the recent round of work. The 745cc twin looks detailed, with no signs of dirt or fluids anywhere. The seller mentions a few newer items including control cables, fuel lines, carbs, and a correct cloth-wrapped electrical harness. New isolastic motor mounts have also been installed, while an upgraded center stand replaced the factory model that was known to be another failure point. These early fastbacks aren’t seen too often these days, especially as nice as this one looks to be. Initial resistance to their elongated tail led to the more conventional roadster that followed, but we think they’ve aged really well.