1966 Ducati Diana Mark 3

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This 1966 Ducati Diana Mark 3 shows 3853 miles and is powered by a 249cc bevel drive single cylinder mated to a 5-speed transmission. Restored by a previous owner, the seller has added only 50 miles during eight years of ownership and reports that it runs and sounds great with all lights and controls in working order. Maintained by the sellers personal mechanic, there are no service records available but will come with clean Indiana title in the sellers name. Believed to have been previously restored, the paint and chrome finishes still appear to be in good condition. The seat, tires, and tank are all described to be in nice condition. It is believed that less than 4000 were built during a four-year production run with few surviving in street trim as many saw competition use. The 18″ wheels wear Michelin tires with a period tread and the rear shocks are adjustable. No records are available as the seller has had all work performed by a personal mechanic. 3853 miles are shown and believed to be correct, though no supporting documents are available. The large Veglia tachometer was unique to the Diana series and had an 8500 rpm redline. Power comes from a 249cc bevel-drive 4-stroke single cylinder mated to a 5-speed manual gearbox. A case stamping is shown in the gallery below. The Mark 3 produced 30 horsepower and was the fastest 250cc street bike available when new. A Cycle World track test found that it was capable of a standing quarter mile in 16.5 seconds at 79.5mph and a top speed of 104mph that was faster than the contemporary Yamaha TD1 race bike.  

1963 BMW R27

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This 1963 BMW R27 is powered by its original 247cc single, which is paired to a 4-speed transmission and shaft final drive. R27s were the final shaft drive single produced by BMW, and feature an Earles Fork front suspension and rubber engine mountings. This example was acquired by the owner two years ago after it was reportedly restored by the previous owner. The bike has been maintained by the seller’s personal mechanic, and recently received a new battery, new points, set timing and carburetor tuning. No modifications are noted, and the bike is being sold by a dealer with a clean Indiana title. The R27 was an evolution of the preceding R26, and used many of the same elements as BMW’s larger boxer-twin powered bikes, including a front Earles Fork. The black paint on the seat, airbox, and headlight housing is intact with a good gloss. The seller notes some chipping on both fenders, and a larger scrape on the right side of the front fender that is shown in the gallery. The tires are older and show some cracking. 22,700 miles are shown, and this figure is believed to be accurate. Power comes from a 247cc 4-stroke mated to a 4-speed manual gearbox. The R27 was rated to produce 18 horsepower, and was the only rubber-mounted vertical single produced by BMW. The bike has been maintained by the seller’s personal mechanic, though no service records are available. The last service included new points, and a general tune-up including set timing and carb tuning. A new battery is fitted. The engine case number is provided above, and the engine is said to be original to the bike. The chassis number is shown above, matches the engine stamping. No service documentation is available.

No Reserve: 1970 Ducati Desmo 350

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This 1970 Ducati Desmo 350 was purchased by the seller four years ago. It shows 5,316 miles which is believed correct, though documentation is not included. Power comes from a 350cc engine which breathes through a rebuilt 29mm Dellorto SS carburetor and is paired to a 5-speed transmission. Further alterations include a stainless steel mount for the original Veglia tachometer, a reproduction silentium silencer, a new header pipe, new chain, and a new ignition switch assembly. All cables are said to have recently been replaced, and this Ducati is now being offered at no reserve with a clean Indiana title. As shown above, the yellow paint on the fuel tank and trim was applied during previous ownership. Several paint flaws are highlighted in the photo gallery below. The frame and all other painted parts are claimed to be original, as is the chrome. There is a spot on the headlight where the chrome has peeled off, and the rear shock springs were painted silver by the previous owner. The fuel tank has recently been resealed. The black leather saddle was purchased from France by the previous owner. Two seam tears are highlighted in the photo gallery below. This Ducati rides on Borrani wheels wearing period Pirelli tires that show cracking and should be replaced. The original Veglia tachometer is on a stainless steel mount, and the seller claims that all lights are in good working order. The odometer currently displays 5,316 miles which the seller believes is correct, though no documentation is included with the sale for verification. The factory 350cc engine is linked to a 5-speed transmission and has been fitted with a recently rebuilt non-original 29mm Dellorto SS carburetor. The factory engine stamping is shown above.

1980 Honda CT 110

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This 1980 Honda CT110 is described as an unmodified example and was purchased by the seller from its second owner. The second owner lived in the Pikes Peak National Forest, and purchased the bike in 2005 to retrieve his mail. After getting too old to use the bike regularly, the bike went into storage in his home in Arizona. Power comes from a 105cc 4-stroke single cylinder engine with a 4-speed semi-automatic transmission. It was last serviced in 2014 by the Honda dealer. This CT110 is sold with a clean Arizona title in the seller’s name. Finished in Tahitian Red, this CT110 retains stock exterior accessories, including the exhaust heat shield, rear rack, and auxilliary fuel tank mounted under the left side of the rear rack. The original toolkit and seat are included as well. A correct Honda seat is currently fitted. Graphics and warning stickers are in place throughout the bike. Some wear is visible at the edges of several body panels. A sticker from Bluff Honda, a dealer in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, is present on the taillight lens. All of the lights are said to work correctly. The single combined instrument includes high beam, neutral and turn signal indicators. The 60 mph speedometer reads several miles per hour beyond the bike’s top speed on flat and level ground, and provides shift points for the four-speed gearbox. Just under 1,700 miles are shown. Power comes from a 105cc 4-stroke single mated to a four speed transmission with an automatic clutch. The 7.6 horsepower engine was reportedly capable of fuel economy above 100 mpg. The previous owner last serviced the bike at a Honda dealer in 2014, where it received fresh fluids and a general tune-up at that time.

1964 BMW R27

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This 1964 BMW R27 is a refurbished example in Dover White with a 247cc single and a 4-speed transmission. The final generation of BMW’s shaft-driven single-cylinder was produced from 1960 to 1966, during which approximately 15,000 were built. This example has been owned by the seller since 2010, when he reportedly purchased it from its third owner. The refurbishment work commenced shortly thereafter to include new paint, an engine rebuild, and more detailed below. Approximately 2,000 miles have been ridden since the work was completed. This R27 comes with an original owner’s manual and will be sold with a Connecticut bill of sale. The refurbishment work included sandblasting of the frame followed by a repaint from original black to factory Dover White under hand-applied black pinstriping. The finish is shown under bright sun and indoor lighting below, where close-up photos also detail the condition of brightwork, rubber, and other hardware. Polished wheels feature new aluminum rims and spokes, and are mounted with Metzeler rubber. Equipment includes a sprung Pagusa seat, hinged rear fender, in-tank storage compartment, factory hand pump, headlight-mounted mirrors, and turn signals mounted at the ends of new handlebars. Instrumentation consists of a functional reverse-sweep 90 mph speedo and a five-digit odometer with just under 17,500 miles indicated. The rubber-mounted 247cc overhead-valve single-cylinder “thumper” was rated at 18 horsepower in stock form and is paired with a 4-speed transmission. The engine was rebuilt during the 2010 work with new piston rings, bearings, and oil slinger, and the exhaust system was also replaced. Induction is from a non-original Mikuni carburetor whose rubber intake hoses are showing their age. An oil change has been carried out within the past year. Suspension is from a leading-link Earles fork/swingarm setup in the front and a rear springarm, one side of which incorporates the enclosed driveshaft. Braking power comes from drums front and rear, both of which were refreshed during the 2010 work. The refinishing work was carried out personally by the seller, with further photos from the process shown below. The motorcycle will be sold with a bill of sale and registration paperwork, as the state of Connecticut does not issue titles for vehicles of this age.

Strange Marriage: Honda XL250/Harley 883 Enduro Build

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This strange custom combines a Honda XL250 enduro frame with an 883cc Harley V-twin, and the seller describes it as a professional build that runs very well. That’s pretty much it for provided information however, and we’re left with lots of questions, including whether or not the frame is up to handling twice the cylinders, twice the power and probably a good deal more weight as well. It’s definitely an interesting bike though, and provided its handling hasn’t been ruined we can see how it could be a lot of fun with great low-down torque and a thumping V-twin soundtrack. Find it here on Craigslist in Los Angeles, California for $6,800. Special thanks to BaT reader Eric B. for this submission. Introduced in 1972 and offered throughout the 80’s, Honda’s XL250 was the first modern four-stroke Enduro and among the first mass-produced motorcycles with a four-valve combustion chamber design. Originally this one would have made about 25 HP at the rear wheels via an air-cooled single, but that setup has given way for an 883cc Harley V-twin. The seller describes the bike as running well and professionally built, but that’s about it for the ad’s description. Power should be up to around 45-50 at the crank, with around the same figure for torque when measured in foot-pounds. The tank has been heavily modified to make room for the Milwaukee motor, including a big cutaway on the right side for its air filter. Up front there’s a skid plate and an oil cooler, and instrumentation looks to remain standard–suspension and lighting too. The exhaust still exits high on the right side, which in combo with the bike’s good ground clearance means it should still be handy off-road, at least provided the big iron-headed V-twin doesn’t make it too top-heavy. Either way it’s hard not to be intrigued by this one.

No Reserve: 1960 Cushman Super Eagle

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This 1960 Cushman Super Eagle shows just 9,538 miles and was recently acquired by the selling dealer, who was told the bike has remained in Oregon from new. It is said to retain mostly original paint and is believed to have been maintained in stock condition aside from added luggage carriers and a custom rear bumper assembly. An accessory windshield, optional buddy seat, and an optional crash bar are also present. This Super Eagle is powered by a correct 7.95 horsepower Husky motor paired to a centrifugal clutch 2-speed transmission. It is now being offered at no reserve by Cascadia Classic with its service manual, guide book, parts manuals, and a clean Oregon title. The seller states that this Cushman appears to retain most of its factory paint, which shows patina commensurate with age. According to the seller, the rear bumper assembly is either a fully custom piece or a rare accessory. This bike rides on Cushman-branded tires. The odometer displays 9,538 miles which the seller believes is correct, though documentation is not available to verify total mileage. The 7.95 horsepower Husky motor is paired to a centrifugal clutch 2-speed transmission and both are stock mechanically per the seller. The factory dash-mounted choke pull is disconnected, and a small pull lever has been attached to the carburetor instead. The horn is currently inoperable, and the bike is reported to run and drive nicely. The factory data plate is shown above. A service manual, guide book, and parts manuals will accompany the sale.

1964 BMW R60/2

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This 1964 BMW R60/2 is powered by a 600cc horizontally-opposed twin paired with a 4-speed transmission and has been with the seller for 34 years. Recent work included replacement head gaskets, a valve adjustment, new carburetor gaskets, an air filter, and an oil change, while new OEM mufflers were purchased in Germany and installed in 2017. The motorcycle shows 36k indicated miles and is sold with a factory tool kit, service manuals, a partial collection of parts receipts, and a clean Michigan title. Finished in traditional black with white pinstriping, this example is fitted with a 3.5-gallon fuel tank, Schorsch Meier dual seat, and touring handlebars with replica Hella bar-end turn signals. Black paint shows its age up close with several chips, wax residue, and a small dent on 
the top of the tank. The rear fender was replaced in 1988. Photos are provided to detail the condition of the brightwork, instruments, fasteners, and other hardware. The headlight has been upgraded with a halogen
 bulb and the taillight is a modern LED replacement. The Earles fork front end received new shock absorbers in 2014, as did the rear swingarm. The chromed steel wheels are shown up close in several photos and the seller notes that while the tires have tread remaining, the front shows sidewall cracking and should be replaced. Power comes from a 600cc horizontally-opposed twin with a 4-speed transmission. Newer items include both head gaskets, carburetor gaskets, the battery, and the air filter, while other recent service consisted of a valve adjustment and oil change. The seller notes scratches on the
 valve covers and that a few drops of oil can be seen after a ride despite a replacement oil pan gasket. New mufflers were purchased in Germany in 1984 and installed in 2017. The bike has reportedly been easy to start after storage when proper procedure is followed by the owner. A later-model Karcoma petcock is fitted to the fuel tank, and the original Everbest unit will also be included. A lockable tool box is located behind the left knee pad and holds a replacement bag from 2013 that contains factory tools. BMW pinstriping was performed by hand and often signed by the striper, and a small R can be seen on the bottom of the tank. An owner’s manual and factory service manual will be included as well as a partial collection of parts receipts for maintenance since 1983, which has been performed personally by the seller as documented in a list in the gallery below. The original frame-mounted tire pump is also present and functional. The seller states that the engine and frame numbers match, and believes that after 34 years of enjoyment the time has come for a new owner.

Jawa-Powered Czech Trike in Chicago: 1959 Velorex Oskar 16/250

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This 1959 Velorex Oskar 16/250 (chassis 2402) is one of a few imported by the seller from Europe, and though still in need of a few small finishing touches, the car has been largely restored. These Czech-built three-wheelers were made for about 20 years from 1950 to the early 70’s, and early, single-cylinder examples like this one are reportedly especially rare. Founded by two bicycle mechanic brothers, Velorex made around 17,000 trikes during their time as a car manufacturer, and the company still exists as a maker of sidecars which are exported to the US and elsewhere. The seller has modified this one slightly to allow starting of its factory 248cc Jawa two-stroke single via Bosch Dynastarter, saving the need to bloody your knuckles with the factory dash-mounted “kick start,” and reports that the funky little car is a blast to drive as well. Find it here on eBay in suburban Chicago, Illinois with a $15k BIN. Reads the ad: “I imported this Oskar in 2004 along with few other Velorexes. It was partially restored before I had it shipped to the US. The frame was sandblasted and painted, new tires mounted on refurbished wheels, and the engine was installed but it still needed a lot of work. The Oskar  was purchased by a gentleman from California who wanted to finish the project and to make and install the covers. Alas, a decade  later the car was still sitting in his warehouse untouched. I purchased the Oskar back from him. I ordered a brand new set of custom made covers from Czech Republic-based upholsterer who specializes in Velorex microcars. The material is identical to that used originally by the Velorex factory. I had a mechanic go through the car and finish the mechanical restoration including sorting out the electrical system, ignition, brakes and a lot of little things that popped up along the way.” Continued from the ad: “Unusually for the 16/250, this example is equipped with a Bosch Dynastarter. The installation looks as if it were done at the factory (the side cover looks cast, not modified by simply grinding off the part covering the shaft). At the time, factory did not produce Dynastarter-equipped cars. It happened later with the 16/350. All Velorexes have a short lever in the cockpit attached via long rod to the kick starter shaft. Using this lever to start the engine is a knuckle-busting experience (I speak with authority of, ahem, first-hand experience) when the engine is cold. Once warmed up, well tuned Jawa engine will start without fuss. On suggestion from the mechanic, I had a compression release valve installed to aid in starting the engine with the Dynastarter. It works beautifully. Original head was not harmed in the process. I sourced a replacement and the original, untouched head comes with the car.” Once more from the seller: “Body covers need to be fitted and installed. Windshield needs to be installed (included, along with a seal). Shakedown runs should be performed before taking it for a long drive. For example, on one of my test drives the chain master link came undone. I replaced the chain with a brand new one. Small problems are likely to surface but nothing major.” Here’s a very similar but fully clothed example featured on BaT last year.

1932 BSA 3-Wheeler

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This 1932 BSA 3-Wheeler is a fully restored example of BSA’s front wheel drive 3-wheeler which the previous owner prepared for the show circuit in the UK. While in the United States, the trike has been shown extensively, including an appearance the Amelia Island Concours in 2010, best in show awards at the MG Car Club show and Thunder by the Bay, First Place awards at the Lake Mirror Classic and Florida West Coast Region AACA Car Show, the DuPont award at the Winter Park Concours d’Elegance, and numerous other showings. The car features a 1021cc BSA v-twin driving the front wheels through a front mounted transaxle, and carries a British Tax disc which expired March 24, 1939. The selling dealer is offering this BSA with a clean Florida title. BSA Cars originated as a division of British manufacturing giant Birmingham Small Arms. While BSA motorcycles remained in production from 1910 through the company’s dissolution in the early 1970s, the automobile division failed and was resurrected several times. This 3-wheeler originated with the company’s third attempt at automobile manufacture in 1929, following the end of production of the company’s 10 h.p. light car in 1926. The three-wheeler is constructed with a metal chassis supporting wooden body framing. The exterior bodywork is primarily leather, with metal fenders and a metal bonnet. The leather bodywork on this example is taut, and finished in a two tone black and blue scheme, with the wheels and metal trim painted to match. The seller notes some marks where the trunk meets the leather side panels. A convertible top and side curtains are included, though they are rendered in canvas rather than leather, and feature clear plastic windows. A British tax and registration disc which expired on the 24th of March, 1939 is affixed to the cowl. The interior is finished in blue leather with a wooden dash and blue carpets. A fire extinguisher is mounted on the passenger’s side of the footwell. The cabin floor is fully flat thanks to the front wheel drive layout. 83k miles are shown. Power comes from a 1021cc BSA V-Twin mated to a 3-speed manual transaxle. The seller’s personal mechanic has maintained the car during their five year ownership. The seller states that the trike runs and drives as it should, and they estimate that it has covered fewer than 200 miles since restoration.