Dutch Leaning Three-Wheeler: 2014 Carver One

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This 2014 Carver One is leaning three-wheeler with a 660cc Daihatsu turbo four delivering 65 HP to the rears. So-called Dynamic Vehicle Control allows the front wheel and main body section to tilt up to 45 degrees while turning, reportedly enhancing cornering grip–we’re sure it adds some drama where it might be lacking from the unmodified Kei car engine. These Dutch-engineered and built tandem two-seaters might be kind of gimmicky, but Clarkson and a few other notable European journalists gave very enthusiastic reviews, and though these have since ceased production, they’re now being used as the basis for a car/bike/gyrocopter called the PAL-V. Find this one here at Gallery Aaldering in Brummen, Netherlands for 45k euros (-$55,500 USD today). Black metallic paintwork still shows pretty much as new, as do all exterior lights and carbon fiber trim. Entry is through a single conventional door on the vehicle’s left side, and visibility should be pretty good in every direction given the large greenhouse. The roof features removable rigid panels, and a soft top is also included for warmer months. The small cabin is finished in black vinyl and carbon fiber trim, and features all the usual controls found in a four-wheeled automobile. The 5-speed manual shifter is found beside the driver’s right knee, and there’s a stereo as well. The yoke-style steering wheel is an aftermarket item, though the factory item will also be included. Here’s a shot of the tandem seating arrangement.. Obviously it’s a pretty tight fit, but everything looks unusually well-finished for this kind of thing, which mirrors what reviews often reported. A turbocharged and intercooled Daihatsu four-cylinder sits within the stationary rear pod, and drives the wheels with 65 HP and 74 lb. ft. Though it’s not exactly a scorcher in the performance department, a 0-60 MPH time of eight seconds and a top speed of 115 MPH are respectable, and likely about as fast as you’d want given its tall, narrow body. No photos of the engine are provided. Here’s a press photo of the Carver at full-tilt–note the distance between the side mirror and the ground. Turn-in body roll is computer-controlled, and dependent upon the quickness of steering inputs, as well as the vehicle’s speed. For some great footage of this machine in action, check out this old Top Gear review.

Gear Cam Drive 15K RPM V4: 1989 Honda VFR400

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This 1989 Honda VFR400R is quite a special bike, being essentially a scaled-down version of its big brother VFR750R homologation special, right down to its 15,000 RPM, gear-driven quad-cam V4, Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm and iconic HRC livery. Designed for and sold primarily for the domestic Japanese market where restrictions made access to larger bikes relatively difficult, these 400-class bikes weren’t quite as quick as 750 variants (making ~60 HP or about half of de-restricted, non-JDM versions of its larger stablemate), but weigh around 40 pounds less and reportedly offer even better handling. This one’s summarized as being in very nice rider condition with 30k original miles and sorted mechanicals. Find it here on Japanese Classics in Richmond, Virginia for $5,500. Special thanks to BaT reader Kyle K. for this submission. The VFR400R was produced from 1986 to 1992, though these third-gen, ’89-on NC30 models are the most sought-after, thanks in large part to twin-headlight styling that mimicked the homologation RC30 VFR750R. This one is especially cool with its likely factory RC30-style HRC livery. The seller admits to a few cosmetic blemishes here and there, and a decent sized gallery of photos show some scratches on the tank but no obvious dents nor any easily noticeable fairing cracks or other damage. No fairing-off photos are provided, so here’s a cutaway of the gem-like 399cc V4, detailing its wonderfully complex gear cam drive. These third-gen models rev to 14,500 and make 59 HP–exactly half of de-restricted, non-Japanese market VFR750R’s. Says the seller: “The electric start allows the bike to easily fire right up. Idle is smooth and the power band is endless with peak torque hitting at 12k while the close ratio 6-speed gearbox shifts flawlessly. The carburetors have been rebuilt and a tune up was just performed.” The cockpit shows some fading and wearing of black painted and anodized parts, possibly suggesting the bike sat out under the sun for a few years–it could probably be cleaned up and restored without too much trouble if you’re looking for perfection, but it’s not distracting. While it’s true Honda built far more 400’s than 750’s (~3,000 made), these smaller bikes offer nearly identical styling and engineering for a fraction of the cost–check out this $38k 750 featured on BaT back in 2011.

1967 Harley-Davidson Aermacchi M50

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This 1967 Harley-Davidson / Aermacchi M50 was purchased by the seller 5 years ago as part of a package deal with a car and has been used primarily as a decorative piece since. Restored by the previous owner, the bike was in running condition when purchased but the seller has never ridden it and can not vouch for it’s current running condition. This M50 is currently registered as non-operative but comes with several receipts, a copy of the service manual, and a clean California title in the seller’s name. Available for only two years before being replaced by the larger M65, the M50 was an inexpensive 50cc lightweight built by Aermacchi in Italy and sold by Harley-Davidson to compete with the influx of small bore Japanese cycles. Restored several years ago by the previous owner, this example has seen very little use. The odometer shows only 29 miles and was probably reset. The true mileage is unknown. The 50cc 2-stroke single is paired with a 3-speed transmission which reportedly propels the bike to a top speed of 45MPH and delivers nearly 100 MPG. The black paint and reupholstered seat present well, and all components were in working condition when the seller purchased it 5 years ago. The wheels and exhaust pipe were re-plated in 2013 and new tires added. Shifting is performed by twisting the left side grip. Details include correct grey colored Harley-Davidson logo grips. Service receipts from the restoration and a copy of the factory service manual will be included.

No Reserve: 1978 BMW R80/7

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This 1978 BMW R80/7 is finished in black with a gold pinstripe and shows 29k miles. Power is provided by an 800cc air-cooled flat-twin paired to a five-speed manual gearbox, and in 2009 the bike received a mechanical and cosmetic refresh. The seller has added approximately 500 miles since acquiring it in 2011. This /7 is now being offered at no reserve with nine years of records and a clear Iowa title in the seller’s name. The seller believes that the bodywork was refinished around 2009 and describes that it was performed to a high standard. The Wienmann aluminum rims are wrapped in Continental rubber and a set of front brake pads plus an aftermarket rotor were installed by the seller in 2013. The type-247 OHV flat-twin was used by BMW from 1969 until 1995. The bike retains a set of points, Bing carburetors, and the factory dual exhaust. A service performed at the end of 2017 included the installation of a new battery and oil change. Receipts and records dating back 2009 are included with the sale.

No Reserve: 1972 BMW R75/5 SWB

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Modified 1952 Vincent Series C Black Shadow

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This 1952 Vincent Black Shadow was owned for many years by racer John Ulver, who ran it at several sprint races and the Bonneville speed trials. It has been modified for these purposes, including vented front brakes, a smaller seat, removal of the front fender, larger carburetors, and more. Acquired by the selling dealer one year ago, this bike is sold with many of the removed stock parts, along with an extensive collection of performance spares as shown below. Power comes from a 998cc V-twin mated to a 4-speed transmission, but the bike is not currently in running condition. The seller reports that the engine and frame numbers are matching, though the original rear frame member has been replaced. This Black Shadow has not been street legal for several years, and it is now being offered with the spares and a clean California title. Modification for racing included removal of numerous components, including the factory seat and front fender. The rear fender was also bobbed, and drag bars were added along with a Black Lightning-style seat, rear sets, alloy wheels, and a fuel tank with a cut-out for the larger carburetors. The clutch cover, rear set plates, and seat brace were also drilled to reduce weight. Engine #F10AB/1B/8711 is said to match uniform frame #RC10611B according to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club. The engine mating number is B59B, and the matching components reportedly confirm the bike as a March 1952 Series C Black Shadow. The 55 horsepower Black Shadow was considered the fastest street legal motorcycle of its time, and although internal modifications are unknown, larger carburetors and straight pipes can be seen. Corrosion is visible on many surfaces, including the engine case, which also shows several chips and scratches as detailed in the gallery. Performance modifications include vented front brakes, shouldered alloy wheels, and polished Girdraulic forks. The rear frame member (RC10747B) was replaced at some time in the past and is said to be the only numbered piece that is not original to the bike. Extensive spares are included, consisting of many of the removed stock pieces as well as various performance items. The stock seat comes with the bike, as do additional straight pipes, heads, carburetors, cylinders, fenders, and more as shown in the gallery below.

Custom 1973 Triumph T140V Bonneville 750

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This 1973 Triumph T140V Bonneville was purchased by the seller 3 years ago and was rebuilt in 2016 as a stripped down cafe racer by Brady Young at Seaweed and Gravel in Encinitas California. Powered by a rebuilt 750cc parallel twin with a 5-speed transmission, this bike now features a Suzuki GSXR 750 front end, Honda XR600 master cylinder, powder coated frame, clip on handle bars, “brat” style seat, and flat track pipes. This Bonneville is sold with a notebook of receipts and a clean California title in the seller’s name. The stock Triumph tank was refinished in metallic blue and the frame powder coated black. The front and rear fenders were removed and clip-on handlebars with leather wrapped grips and a smaller amber tinted headlight added. No gauges are present but the seller estimates around 1500 miles have been added since his purchase. The tail of the frame was bobbed with Hagon adjustable shocks mounted and a shortened gold chain. A “Brat” style seat was fitted, the license plate relocated to the inner fender area, and a small LED tail light attached below the seat frame. The front end features larger diameter upside down forks sourced from a Suzuki GSXR750 and wears a single 310mm disc with a 3 piston caliper. The master cylinder comes from a Honda XR600 and the powder coated wheels wear Bridgestone Battlax tires. As part of the customizing, the 750cc parallel twin was rebuilt and the cases powder coated black. Modifications include Mikuni round slide carburetors, foam Uni filters, and a Boyer electronic ignition with an Emgo coil. The T140 used the frame as an oil tank and the 5-speed transmission retains the original right side shift. The flat track-inspired pipes are covered in header wrap and have short silencers. The seller can provide receipts for all work performed in the last 3 years.

No Reserve: 1997 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage Softail Classic

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This 1997 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage Soft Tail Classic was purchased by the seller two years ago from the widow of the original owner. Currently showing just over 18k miles, the bike is equipped with a windscreen, crash bar, accessory lights, and saddle bags. Power comes from an 80ci V-twin, which is mated to a 5-speed gearbox and has been fitted with a Stage 1 carburetor kit and a 2 into 1 exhaust. An oil change has been performed during the seller’s ownership, and a fresh battery was also added along with new tires. This Softail Classic is now being offered at no reserve with a fringed factory dual seat, a bolt-on luggage rack, and a clean Texas title in the seller’s name. The bike is finished in Vivid Black, and optional equipment includes a windshield, accessory lights, and crash bars. The seller notes a minor nick on the front fender, as well as a small chip and light scratch on the gas tank. A few scratches and a scuff can also be seen on the rear fender from where the pillion passenger seat was once mounted. The windshield was recently replaced due to age-related wear, and new whitewall tires were also fitted along with new rim bands and inner tubes. A Badlands run, brake, and turn signal module was added for safety and converts the rear turn signals into running and brake lights while still retaining turn signal functionality. Cargo can be stored in studded leather saddle bags mounted on either side of the rear wheel. The seller has added approximately 500 miles during his two years of ownership. Power comes from a 80ci V-twin mated to a 5-speed manual transmission. An aftermarket Thunderheader 2 into 1 exhaust and a Stage 1 carburetor kit have been added. No service records are available as the original owner was an aircraft mechanic who performed all necessary maintenance personally. The seller had the oil changed, the carburetor rebuilt, and a new battery installed by the local Harley Davidson dealer in 2016. A passenger pillion seat is included, as is a fringed Harley Davidson dual seat with removable driver’s backrest and a bolt-on luggage rack with passenger backrest. The seller has provided videos of both cold and warm starts and a brief drive by.

Ex-Dan Gurney 1975 Honda XL175

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This 1975 Honda XL175 was purchased new by Dan Gurney’s All American Racers Inc. and now shows just 1,085 miles. Gurney gave the bike to engine developer John Miller in 1979, who reportedly never used it and kept it on his ranch until his passing in 2014. The selling dealer acquired this Honda from Miller’s estate and has re-sealed the 175cc 4-stroke single and 5-speed gearbox. A selection of AAR memorabilia is included with the sale, including business cards from Gurney and Miller, stickers, and articles on AAR. This XL175 is now being offered by DENWERKS with California blue plates and the original California pink slip signed by Dan Gurney. The bike is finished in Honda Orange with black trim and silver fenders. Scratches are visible on the fuel tank and front fender, and lighting and mirrors are still in place. Newer tires are fitted. Instrumentation on XL175s included a speedometer and a tachometer through 1976. The instruments are said to work correctly, and 1,085 miles are shown on the 5-digit odometer. Power comes from a 175cc four-stroke single cylinder engine with a 5-speed gearbox. When the seller acquired the bike the engine was leaking, so the seller removed the engine and re-sealed it. An employee of the seller has ridden the bike about a mile, and footage of the bike running and moving on the seller’s property is included in the attached video. The seller has provided photos matching the original pink slip to the engine number, frame tag, and blue California license plate. A selection of AAR memorabilia is included with the bike, including magazine articles, business cards from Dan Gurney and John Miller, stickers and other small items. A walkaround and ride video is attached below.

Three-Wheel Drive: 1960 Moto Guzzi Mulo Meccanico

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This 1960 Moto Guzzi Mulo Meccanico isn’t the first military trike to be featured on BaT, but it’s definitely the most unusual. Known by the Italian Army as the Autoveicolo Da Montagna (mountain vehicle), it’s an all-wheel drive machine powered by a 750cc V-twin and intended to transport ground troops and field artillery over difficult terrain quickly–it could reportedly conquer inclines of up to 31 degrees. Caterpillar tracks could be fitted to the rear wheels, but a number of fatal accidents due to inherent instability at speed led to their discontinuation after just three years of production. The seller says this one remains all original and in perfect working order with all accessories including said tracks. Find it here at Garlatti Moto in Verona, Italy for 17k euros (~$21,300 USD today–see inventory page for price). Special thanks to BaT reader Kyle K. for this submission. The cockpit sports a thickly padded seat and integrated backrest, and the fuel tank is mounted directly behind and features a pair of storage lockers. The vertical hoop appears to be a grab handle for rear passengers, the bed is of a decent size, and the rig can reportedly tow/haul a combined load of 1,100 pounds. Tracks are seen sitting inside the bed–unfortunately no photos of them fitted are provided. A speedometer is the only instrumentation provided, and its odometer shows 3,357 kilometers. The front wheel assembly is quite an interesting piece of engineering, as it integrates a bevel gear system for the steering wheel, front wheel drive shaft, shock absorber and drum brake all in a monotube fork. Check out the wide gated shifter too, for selecting six forward speeds or one reverse. The V-twin is able to handle poor quality fuel due to low compression, and displaces 754cc with a power rating of just 20 HP–20% of which is routed to the front wheel. Other features include a waterproof ignition coil, and the ability to adjust track width on the fly. For reference, here’s a photo of another example fully kitted out with rear tracks, front tire chain, and spare wheel mounted behind the fuel tank. We’ve never heard of this model before, but this video gives a pretty good idea of its capability.