1972 Norton 750 Combat Commando

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This 1972 Norton Combat Commando was acquired by the seller five years ago in stock condition from the son of the original owner. Dave Katz of Classic Bike Experience in Vermont was then commissioned to build it into a road-going tribute to Norton production racers. Work was completed two years ago and included the installation of authentic Dunstall body work. Powered by a 745cc parallel-twin coupled to a 4-speed gearbox, the bike was refurbished with an emphasis on preservation and reliability. Systems were renewed or rebuilt over a period of one year as detailed below, with the goal of creating a reliable weekend rider. Now showing 13,300 miles, this Norton is offered with all build receipts as well as a clean Vermont transferable registration. The wheels were re-laced with stainless steel spokes during the refresh, and new tires were also installed. The seller notes that the paint shows some age-related scratches and fading as well as a few stress cracks in the fiberglass bodywork. Turn signals and bar end mirrors were added for safety. All new wiring harnesses were fitted, while the forks and brakes were rebuilt. The 13,300 indicated miles are believed accurate by the seller. An aftermarket Alton electric start was fitted, though the original kick starter was also retained. All gaskets and seals were renewed, and bearings checked and replaced wherever needed. New shocks and suspension bushings were also installed along with NOS Amal carbs and Norton peashooter pipes. The build was completed two years ago by Classic Bike Experience in Vermont and is described as a renovation rather than a restoration, as the primary objective was reliability. All receipts related to the work performed are included in the sale. A short video can be seen below and shows a walk-around as well as the bike starting. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZOY-Q54gtY&feature=em-upload_owner

No Reserve: 1975 BMW R75/6

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This 1975 BMW R75/6 is a largely stock example which received some refurbishment work prior to current ownership. The motorcycle has been owned for a year by the seller, who purchased it from a local BMW dealership. The bike is powered by a 750cc horizontal air-cooled twin, and modifications include twin front disc brakes as well as Mikuni carburetors. This R75 is sold with a clean Texas title and the owner states he receives quite a bit of attention riding it. The fuel tank and fenders were reportedly repainted in brick red metallic with factory-style pinstriping. By 1975, rubber knee pads had replaced the chrome tank sides seen on the earlier models. Wire spoked wheels wear more modern tires, though the rear is showing some wear. A 140mph speedo is present and a stand-alone tach was offered for the first time on the /6. The five-digit odometer currently shows just over 14,500 miles. The two-place seat is newer item according to the seller, who has added approximately 200 miles during the last year and says the bike rides well without any issues. Power is from the 750cc version of BMW’s air-cooled horizontal twin which was originally rated at 50 horsepower. A top-end rebuild and piston ring replacement were reportedly carried out within the last two years and fueling is via Mikuni carburetors rather than the original Bing units. Both mufflers have been replaced and an electronic ignition was added in 2016. Shifting is via a 5-speed transmission which sends power rearward via a shaft rather than a chain. Dealer services within the last two years included replacement of a leaking camshaft seal as well as an oil change performed in 2016. Dual front disc brakes are reportedly from an R90S and stainless brake hoses have been added. The bike has not been registered for 2017. Records from the last two years of dealer service are included.

No Reserve: 1965 Honda CB160

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This 1965 Honda CB160 shows 23k miles and was modified into a cafe racer style in 2010. The seller and his father have owned the bike for the past six years. As a first-year model of the CB160, it is powered by a 161cc single-overhead cam four-stroke twin paired to a 4-speed manual transmission. The petcock was recently rebuilt, and additional modifications include a clubman bar, license plate bracket, kill switch, and updated charging system. It is titled in Georgia as a 1969 CB160 and is being offered for sale with no reserve. The tank, fenders, and chain guard were hydro-dipped, resulting in a carbon-fiber effect on the finish. According to the seller, this example maintained a stock appearance until it was modified into a cafe racer seven years ago. A clubman handlebar was added, and 23k miles are indicated on the odometer, with only 200 miles added by the seller. The speedometer is not currently functioning, which the seller believes is due to a faulty speedometer cable. The 161cc four-stroke was serviced in December at Sport Cycle in Savannah, Georgia and according to the seller makes good torque through all four gears. The petcock was rebuilt, new gaskets were installed in the carburetors, and the charging system was updated with a unit from Rick’s Motorsports. The battery was also replaced. An ignition kill switch was added, and the seller notes that some idle adjustment is occasionally necessary. A couple service records are included in the sale, with prior history largely unknown. Motorcycles imported to Florida in the 1960s were reportedly not issued titles until 1969, and this example is titled as a 1969 CB160.

No Reserve: 1955 Maico Typhoon

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This 1955 Maico Typhoon is a rare 395cc two-stroke example that was purchased out of the Mike Doyle Museum Collection six months ago. It remains largely original and features a leading-link front end and distinct blue fairings. Recent service includes a new set of tires, cables, carburetor cleaning, and a fresh battery. It was shown at the Quail Motorcycle Gathering earlier this year and has been ridden about 25 miles by the seller. This Maico is now being offered with a clean California title in the seller’s name. The Maisch brothers founded the Ulrich Maisch & Co near Stuttgart, Germany in 1926. Motorcycle production began in 1931 with small displacement two-stroke models. The Typhoon was introduced in 1953 with a 349cc and later a 395cc motor, it was the largest and most innovative machine in their lineup at the time. The streamlined body features a rear fairing, red vinyl seat, chrome tank sides, and yellow welting. The stylized nose includes a leading-link front end with a valanced fender and an integrated drum brake. Power comes from a 395cc two-stroke parallel twin, which was rated at 22.5hp when new and features a 4-speed manual transmission. The engine is a stressed member of the frame and joined by a single top tube and down tube. Carburetors are hidden beneath the bodywork and have been recently serviced. The Duplex drive chain runs in a fully enclosed cast-aluminum swingarm and replacement tires have been installed on the shouldered aluminum rims by the seller within the past six months. Instrumentation is limited to a speedometer centered on the headlight bucket. 59k kilometers (~37k miles) are shown on the odometer. A hand-pump is affixed to the bottom of the hinged seat with storage underneath.

Three Across: 1978 Laverda 1200

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This 1978 Laverda 1200 (chassis 0720614415) is described by the seller as very original, and overall condition does look very nice. Over the past six years the seller claims to completed some worthwhile jobs, including brake and hydraulic work, wheel, tank, and side cover refinishing, carb work, a recent valve adjustment and more. These Italian triples sound like nothing else, and this one’s blue and orange color scheme really stands out. Find it here on eBay in Portland, Oregon with reserve not met. Bright blue paint is accented with orange striping on the tank and tail fairing, and provides an interesting alternative to the reds and greens more commonly seen on these bikes. The seller says that the fuel tank, air box covers, and wheels were refinished under their tenure, while the fenders, silencers, and bars all retain brightly polished surfaces. Marzocchi forks and shocks are found at either end, while all lights and lenses look bright and clear. The basic cockpit has large, easy-to-read gauges with clear lenses, accented by polished bars. There’s 23,800 miles showing on the odometer, and the seller believes it’s accurate. The twin cam triple was employed in a few different models, and pushed about 73 HP through a 5-speed transmission. This one recently received a valve adjustment and carb cleaning, while the clutch, drive sprockets, and chain have also been replaced. The engine shows very well with no signs of leaks or oxidization on its various machined and polished finishes. As an exotic, interesting, pretty and fairly scarce motorcycle, it’s hard to see where you could go wrong with this one if it’s as good as claimed.

First Baja 1000 Winner: Two-Owner 1964 Honda CL72 Scrambler

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This 1964 Honda CL72 Scrambler is reportedly on sale by its second owner from new, and condition looks to be very good for a now-53 year-old machine. This model was the very first to win the Baja 1000, and good examples aren’t common. The seller says this one benefits from a marque specialist top end rebuild dating to 2014, as well as a nearly all-stock setup. It sounds to be a strong runner ready for riding, and sale even includes the original bill of sale. Find it here on eBay in Los Angeles, California with reserve not met. Special thanks to BaT reader Eric for this submission. The seller describes a highly original bike that’s always been garaged during their 29 year ownership tenure. Purchased from the original owner in 1988, the bike retains all stock equipment apart from the twin leading-shoe front brake setup, though the original hub and rim are included should the next owner want to revert to bone-stock. Mileage is reportedly accurate, and the all-aluminum, twin cam, 250cc parallel twin benefits from a professional top end rebuild dating to 2014. The seller admits that the bike has been ridden more in the past weeks than the preceding 20-25 years, though a carb and tank cleaning reportedly have it starting easily, idling well, and running strong during their 10-mile round-trip commute. Sale includes the original order form/bill of sale, and needs sound to be limited to small jobs like adjusting the brakes and speedo.

California Registered: 1982 Honda NCZ 50 Motocompo Project

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This 1982 Honda NCZ 50 Motocompo is a JDM model scooter originally designed to fit in the back of a subcompact car. They were often sold along with Honda City’s, and AutoArt even includes one with their 1/18 scale model of the Turbo II. This one is only shown partially unfolded, but the seller admits it will need restorative work for cracked bodywork and “some surface rust.” It is said to have been running recently however, and sounds as if it should start with a fresh battery. Find it here on Craigslist in Redwood City, California for $3,500. Special thanks to BaT reader David R. for this submission. Sold from 1981-’83, 53,369 were made, but survivors seem to be pretty scarce and are now considered very collectible. Check out this bizarre series of Japanese television ads featuring the City, Motocompo, and British ska band Madness. Says the seller: “The bike needs restoration. As you can see from the photos, the body panel has a crack and there is some surface rust. I took the battery out because the one that it came with didn’t fit 100%. It was running before I took the battery out but probably needs a rebuild.” We’re not sure if that means the 2.5 horse, 49cc air-cooled two-stroke single needs to be rebuilt, or if the seller is commenting on the scooter in general. It is apparently California registered however, which could be worth the price of admission alone for someone as interested in riding as showing it off in the trunk of a Bulldog.

No Reserve: 1960 NSU Prima III Scooter

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This 1960 NSU Prima III shows 16,435 kilometers (~10,200 miles) and was purchased by the seller two years ago. Powered by a 146cc engine and paired with a 4-speed manual gearbox, the engine and carburetor are said to have been rebuilt by a previous owner who also updated the fuel petcock, and performed a single battery conversion. Since his purchase, the seller performed a repaint to most of the scooter’s exterior surfaces as well as an oil change and carburetor adjustment. This Prima is now offered at no reserve and will be sold with a clean Washington title in the seller’s name. NSU produced the Lambretta under license from Innocenti for six years until the launch of their own Prima model for the 1956 model year. The body, handlebars, and front fender were given a repaint by the seller in the current pastel green color, and the newer finish shows well in the provided photographs. Hand grips were replaced with OEM-quality German replacements. Badges and trim remain in a nice cosmetic condition and show at a level befitting the scooter’s age and mileage. Turn signal lenses are newer examples fitted by the previous owner. Corrosion is present along the trim ring of the functional VDO speedometer, which registers 16,435 kilometers (~10,200 miles) which the seller believes is accurate. Everything on the scooter works as it should according to the seller, including the lights, turn signals, and horn. The engine is a 146cc unit is reported to have been rebuilt by a previous owner, who also rebuilt the carburetor, updated the fuel petcock, and performed a single battery conversion. Additional work by the previous owner includes: Cleaning  and resealing of the fuel tank New cables installed New wheel bearings Muffler baffle rebuilt to original specification New front brakes Driven approximately 150 kilometers (~93 miles) by the seller, the scooter is said to drive well was recently serviced with an oil change and carburetor adjustment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYZBzohG16w&feature=em-share_video_user The seller has provided a video of a brief walk-around of the scooter at idle that can be seen above.

No Reserve: 1957 Vespa 150 Project

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This 1957 Vespa 150 was bought new in Italy by a second cousin of the seller’s father and has remained in the family since. It was brought to the US and eventually passed to the original owner’s sister in Los Angeles, and the seller acquired it from her about twenty years ago. A cosmetic refurbishment was then undertaken with new stock parts, and the scooter has been kept as a display piece in the seller’s home. It was running before being put on display around 15 years ago, but the the fluids were drained shortly after and it has not been started since. This Vespa is registered as a non-running vehicle and is being offered at no reserve with a clean California title in the seller’s name. Per the seller, the body was repainted poorly at some point and the scooter was in rough cosmetic condition when they acquired it. A repaint was conducted, and two paint chips are noted on one side. Much of the trim was also replaced, though some original pieces that the seller was unable to source at the time are still present. The rear pillion seat is missing. This era of Vespa scooter used bicycle-style handlebars with the headlight mounted on a pod integrated with the handlebar stem. Later Vespas used a different style of handlebar, with a painted body-colored housing which extended outwards towards the grip. The seller did not change the speedometer/odometer during the restoration, and it is said to be original. There are some flaws in the chrome housing and the gauge face has yellowed. The odometer shows 4,437 miles. The 150cc single-cylinder is paired to a 4-speed manual gearbox. When the seller first brought the bike home, the plug was changed, carburetor cleaned, carbon was cleared out of the head, the fuel tank flushed, and the bike was re-filled with new pre-mix. The initial startup was by bump-start, though it is said to have kicked over normally after that. Because mechanical brakes are equipped, soft rubber components are limited to the tires, fuel line, and the rubber body gaskets and trim. The Vespa was ridden an estimated 50 miles before being drained of fluids and put on display. It has not been run since.

Exotic 180 Degree Triple: 1982 Laverda Mirage 1200 TS

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This 1982 Laverda Mirage 1200 TS is a South African market bike that moved Stateside in the early 90’s, where it reportedly hibernated indoors until very recently. The seller has gone through the carbs, brakes, and more, and the bike is now said to run, shift, and stop as it should. A big 1115cc twin cam triple should give bags of character, especially with this bike’s 180 degree crankshaft–one of the last to be so equipped according to the seller. Find it here on eBay in Miami, Florida for $11k OBO. A nice, even coat of silver covers the fairings, side panels, and tank, and as part of recommissioning, the forks received new seals, while brakes received rebuilt calipers, master cylinder, new pistons, and seals. Tires look to be in decent shape, however they are over two decades old and will need to be replaced. The cockpit is pretty comprehensive, and appears to be in good shape as well. The grips appear to be a bit weathered, but not much else can be complained about. The windscreen and mirrors remain in good condition, and the seller mentions that the ignition wires were replaced due to severe corrosion. Just over 40k kilometers are shown on the counter, which equates to just under 25k miles. The twin-cam, 1115cc triple is laid out with the center piston at 180 degrees relative to the outboards, similar to some of its siblings. There’s not a lot to see with the fairings obscuring most of the view here, but what does show is definitely enticing. Some minor oxidation can be seen on various hardware, but that seems to be the extent of the issues at hand. The bike sounds really good in this short video linked by the seller, starting quickly and settling into a chattering, off-beat idle before roaring off with a sound that’s somewhere in between the rawness of a Ducati L-twin and the turbine-like whoosh of a Japanese four. They don’t come much more exotic or pretty at this end of the market, and you’ll probably never run into another.