First Baja 1000 Winner: Two-Owner 1964 Honda CL72 Scrambler

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This 1964 Honda CL72 Scrambler is reportedly on sale by its second owner from new, and condition looks to be very good for a now-53 year-old machine. This model was the very first to win the Baja 1000, and good examples aren’t common. The seller says this one benefits from a marque specialist top end rebuild dating to 2014, as well as a nearly all-stock setup. It sounds to be a strong runner ready for riding, and sale even includes the original bill of sale. Find it here on eBay in Los Angeles, California with reserve not met. Special thanks to BaT reader Eric for this submission. The seller describes a highly original bike that’s always been garaged during their 29 year ownership tenure. Purchased from the original owner in 1988, the bike retains all stock equipment apart from the twin leading-shoe front brake setup, though the original hub and rim are included should the next owner want to revert to bone-stock. Mileage is reportedly accurate, and the all-aluminum, twin cam, 250cc parallel twin benefits from a professional top end rebuild dating to 2014. The seller admits that the bike has been ridden more in the past weeks than the preceding 20-25 years, though a carb and tank cleaning reportedly have it starting easily, idling well, and running strong during their 10-mile round-trip commute. Sale includes the original order form/bill of sale, and needs sound to be limited to small jobs like adjusting the brakes and speedo.

California Registered: 1982 Honda NCZ 50 Motocompo Project

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This 1982 Honda NCZ 50 Motocompo is a JDM model scooter originally designed to fit in the back of a subcompact car. They were often sold along with Honda City’s, and AutoArt even includes one with their 1/18 scale model of the Turbo II. This one is only shown partially unfolded, but the seller admits it will need restorative work for cracked bodywork and “some surface rust.” It is said to have been running recently however, and sounds as if it should start with a fresh battery. Find it here on Craigslist in Redwood City, California for $3,500. Special thanks to BaT reader David R. for this submission. Sold from 1981-’83, 53,369 were made, but survivors seem to be pretty scarce and are now considered very collectible. Check out this bizarre series of Japanese television ads featuring the City, Motocompo, and British ska band Madness. Says the seller: “The bike needs restoration. As you can see from the photos, the body panel has a crack and there is some surface rust. I took the battery out because the one that it came with didn’t fit 100%. It was running before I took the battery out but probably needs a rebuild.” We’re not sure if that means the 2.5 horse, 49cc air-cooled two-stroke single needs to be rebuilt, or if the seller is commenting on the scooter in general. It is apparently California registered however, which could be worth the price of admission alone for someone as interested in riding as showing it off in the trunk of a Bulldog.

No Reserve: 1960 NSU Prima III Scooter

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This 1960 NSU Prima III shows 16,435 kilometers (~10,200 miles) and was purchased by the seller two years ago. Powered by a 146cc engine and paired with a 4-speed manual gearbox, the engine and carburetor are said to have been rebuilt by a previous owner who also updated the fuel petcock, and performed a single battery conversion. Since his purchase, the seller performed a repaint to most of the scooter’s exterior surfaces as well as an oil change and carburetor adjustment. This Prima is now offered at no reserve and will be sold with a clean Washington title in the seller’s name. NSU produced the Lambretta under license from Innocenti for six years until the launch of their own Prima model for the 1956 model year. The body, handlebars, and front fender were given a repaint by the seller in the current pastel green color, and the newer finish shows well in the provided photographs. Hand grips were replaced with OEM-quality German replacements. Badges and trim remain in a nice cosmetic condition and show at a level befitting the scooter’s age and mileage. Turn signal lenses are newer examples fitted by the previous owner. Corrosion is present along the trim ring of the functional VDO speedometer, which registers 16,435 kilometers (~10,200 miles) which the seller believes is accurate. Everything on the scooter works as it should according to the seller, including the lights, turn signals, and horn. The engine is a 146cc unit is reported to have been rebuilt by a previous owner, who also rebuilt the carburetor, updated the fuel petcock, and performed a single battery conversion. Additional work by the previous owner includes: Cleaning  and resealing of the fuel tank New cables installed New wheel bearings Muffler baffle rebuilt to original specification New front brakes Driven approximately 150 kilometers (~93 miles) by the seller, the scooter is said to drive well was recently serviced with an oil change and carburetor adjustment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYZBzohG16w&feature=em-share_video_user The seller has provided a video of a brief walk-around of the scooter at idle that can be seen above.

No Reserve: 1957 Vespa 150 Project

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This 1957 Vespa 150 was bought new in Italy by a second cousin of the seller’s father and has remained in the family since. It was brought to the US and eventually passed to the original owner’s sister in Los Angeles, and the seller acquired it from her about twenty years ago. A cosmetic refurbishment was then undertaken with new stock parts, and the scooter has been kept as a display piece in the seller’s home. It was running before being put on display around 15 years ago, but the the fluids were drained shortly after and it has not been started since. This Vespa is registered as a non-running vehicle and is being offered at no reserve with a clean California title in the seller’s name. Per the seller, the body was repainted poorly at some point and the scooter was in rough cosmetic condition when they acquired it. A repaint was conducted, and two paint chips are noted on one side. Much of the trim was also replaced, though some original pieces that the seller was unable to source at the time are still present. The rear pillion seat is missing. This era of Vespa scooter used bicycle-style handlebars with the headlight mounted on a pod integrated with the handlebar stem. Later Vespas used a different style of handlebar, with a painted body-colored housing which extended outwards towards the grip. The seller did not change the speedometer/odometer during the restoration, and it is said to be original. There are some flaws in the chrome housing and the gauge face has yellowed. The odometer shows 4,437 miles. The 150cc single-cylinder is paired to a 4-speed manual gearbox. When the seller first brought the bike home, the plug was changed, carburetor cleaned, carbon was cleared out of the head, the fuel tank flushed, and the bike was re-filled with new pre-mix. The initial startup was by bump-start, though it is said to have kicked over normally after that. Because mechanical brakes are equipped, soft rubber components are limited to the tires, fuel line, and the rubber body gaskets and trim. The Vespa was ridden an estimated 50 miles before being drained of fluids and put on display. It has not been run since.

Exotic 180 Degree Triple: 1982 Laverda Mirage 1200 TS

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This 1982 Laverda Mirage 1200 TS is a South African market bike that moved Stateside in the early 90’s, where it reportedly hibernated indoors until very recently. The seller has gone through the carbs, brakes, and more, and the bike is now said to run, shift, and stop as it should. A big 1115cc twin cam triple should give bags of character, especially with this bike’s 180 degree crankshaft–one of the last to be so equipped according to the seller. Find it here on eBay in Miami, Florida for $11k OBO. A nice, even coat of silver covers the fairings, side panels, and tank, and as part of recommissioning, the forks received new seals, while brakes received rebuilt calipers, master cylinder, new pistons, and seals. Tires look to be in decent shape, however they are over two decades old and will need to be replaced. The cockpit is pretty comprehensive, and appears to be in good shape as well. The grips appear to be a bit weathered, but not much else can be complained about. The windscreen and mirrors remain in good condition, and the seller mentions that the ignition wires were replaced due to severe corrosion. Just over 40k kilometers are shown on the counter, which equates to just under 25k miles. The twin-cam, 1115cc triple is laid out with the center piston at 180 degrees relative to the outboards, similar to some of its siblings. There’s not a lot to see with the fairings obscuring most of the view here, but what does show is definitely enticing. Some minor oxidation can be seen on various hardware, but that seems to be the extent of the issues at hand. The bike sounds really good in this short video linked by the seller, starting quickly and settling into a chattering, off-beat idle before roaring off with a sound that’s somewhere in between the rawness of a Ducati L-twin and the turbine-like whoosh of a Japanese four. They don’t come much more exotic or pretty at this end of the market, and you’ll probably never run into another.

1974 Rickman Honda CR750

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This 1974 Rickman Honda CR750 was purchased by the seller nine years ago as a new old stock kit and assembled to period specification by a noted European motorcycle restorer. The seller states that considerable effort was made to create a bike that is an accurate representation of what was available to enthusiasts of the time, including correct-style Dunlop TT100 tires, English “Stadium” bar end mirrors, and original nickle-plated center and side stands. Utilizing many of the mechanical components from a Honda CR750, the bike is powered by an 810cc inline-four that has been fitted with Keihin carburetors and is paired to a 5-speed gearbox. This Rickman is now offered with a clean New York title in the seller’s name. The Rickman brothers made a name for themselves by building nickle-plated frames that were both lighter and more rigid than the factory offerings of the time. Buyers would get a frame, swingarm, forks, fiberglass bodywork, wheels, brakes, clip-ons, and rear sets and then install a donor motor and electrics. This example was recently on display at the Lars Anderson Transportation Museum as part of the “Beauty of the Beast” exhibit. Photos of the build process can be seen in the gallery below. All fiberglass pieces are in finished the original orange gel coat, and the only painted pieces are the side covers and headlight shell, which were not originally supplied by Rickman. The tank has been coated with Caswell two part epoxy to prevent damage from modern fuel blends. All instruments and switch gear are correct Honda parts, and the wiring harness is a fused unit sourced from a late production CB750. About 8k miles have been covered since the build was completed. The engine is a 1971 K1 Honda CB750 inline-four that has been rebuilt with an 810cc kit and a Norris R cam grind. Rebuilt 28mm Keihin carbs with velocity stacks improve the mid range power, and new old stock HM300 pipes with modified baffles give a throaty exhaust note. The frame retains its original nickel plating, which the seller mentions is completely intact. This bike also includes a rare Japanese market nickle-plated side stand. Brakes are the correct Lockheed single piston discs both front and rear. The wheels have been rebuilt with spokes that are one gauge larger per a 1975 service bulletin written by Craig Vetter that mentioned racers were having a problem with broken spokes. Tires are modern versions of the period Dunlop K81 TT100s. The seller states that this is a very authentic example and has provided a brief-walk around video below.

Rare Rickman: 1974 Honda CR750

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This 1974 Rickman Honda CR750 (VIN 2F4148G) is a special bike featuring great cosmetics nose to tail, with several rebuilt parts and a 60cc displacement increase over stock. The Rickman brothers were known for cobbling together interesting and capable bikes, and these Honda-based machines were considered to be some of the best they offered. The seller says it starts right up, rides well on the road, and has spent the last 12 months on display in the Larz Andersen Automotive Museum. Find it here on eBay in Mount Kisco, New York with reserve not met. A nickel-plated frame constructed from Reynolds 531 manganese molybdenum is the backbone of this bike, and was known to drastically improve handling characteristics over the stock Honda frame. Fiberglass bodywork is said to be original, and wears a gel coat finish in Competition Orange with no obvious flaws. The seller says that the fuel tank has been lined with epoxy, and that the wheels have been rebuilt with larger-gauge spokes. The cockpit is pretty straight forward with simple controls, large dial (OEM Honda) gauges, and clip-on style handlebars. An upgraded wiring harness with fuse box was installed at some point, but otherwise everything appears to remain much as it was when new. A little over 8k miles are shown on the odometer. The four-cylinder is a 750 Honda from 1971 that’s been bumped up to 810cc. The seller notes good midrange punch by way of a Norris cam, 28mm Keihin carbs, and screened Velocity stacks. The exhaust was replaced with NOS HM300 pipes, and the factory baffles have been modified according to the seller. We can appreciate why this bike was chosen for display at a museum, but would much rather see it in action out on a track or some local twisties.

No Reserve: 1991 BMW K1

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This 1991 BMW K1 shows 70k miles and has been in the San Francisco Bay Area since new. The K1 was BMW’s flagship sport bike and is powered by a fuel-injected 987cc DOHC inline-four paired to a close-ratio 5-speed gearbox. Described as a presentable example that could be ridden home by the purchaser, this example is largely original apart from a Fox shock absorber and Alcantara seat material. It was acquired by the seller three years ago, and a level 2 service was performed within the last 2,500 miles. Current mechanical needs include a leaking fork seal. This K1 is now offered at no reserve with a clean California title. The fairing design was wind tunnel developed and offered a drag coefficient of .34, which was the lowest of any production bike up to that time. The bike was capable of over 140 mph and is equipped with four piston Brembo calipers and ABS. Age related damage includes dull paint as well as some abrasions to the fairing from a stationary drop. Several scratches, paint chips, and minor cracks are detailed in the gallery below. Some corrosion is visible on the aluminum cases and drive line. The fuel gauge does not illuminate. The 987cc DOHC inline-four made 95 horsepower when new and is said to start easily, run well, and pull hard with no oil loss. Owners manuals, the original tool kit, recent receipts, and extra keys are included in the sale, as are factory soft cases with rain covers. The seller has provided videos of a brief walk-around and a cold start that can be seen below.

Momentum Machine: 1990 Honda NS50F in Rare US Spec

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This 1990 Honda NS50F is one of only around 200 exported to the US for that model year, the only it was offered here. Despite its size, these are street legal bikes capable of around 60 MPH (depending on the weight of the rider). This one looks to be in pretty good shape despite non-OEM mirrors and a scratch or two, and the seller says it runs very well and is fun to ride. Brakes are by drums at each end, and this one doesn’t even have the optional tach–motorcycles don’t come much simpler, and that’s a big part of the appeal. Find it here on Craigslist in Lompoc, California for $2,500. Special thanks to BaT reader Andre for this submission. The seller notes 3,400 miles, and adds that the oil injection pump has been disabled–pre-mix will need to be added at a 32:1 ratio. The tires, chain, and battery are all reported to be new, and paint finish on the little single and expansion pipe still looks very good. Just in case you didn’t notice the lack of fins on the barrel, huge Liquid Cooled scripts on either side of the tail are there to make it clear. The non-factory mirrors don’t gel with the rest of the bike too well, and NOS or even good used replacements probably won’t be easy to come by. That’s a pretty small nit to pick though, along with a few scratches on the tank. A tach was optional, so shifting the 6-speed gearbox will need to be done by ear. Tiny two-stoke bikes can be a lot of fun, but at well under 200 pounds soaking wet, you’ll want to ride this one an empty stomach for best results.

Original-Owner 1979 Honda CBX

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This 1979 Honda CBX shows just 8,549 miles and was purchased new by the seller in January 1979 at Long Beach Honda in southern California. Powered by a 1047cc DOHC inline-six paired to a 5-speed, the bike is said to remain very original and has always been garaged. Ridden mostly on weekends, it spent most of its life in Huntington Beach, California before recently relocating to Arizona. The seller states that it has received yearly oil and air filter changes, as well as fresh tires and batteries when necessary. This CBX is located in Overgaard, Arizona and is sold with an extra carburetor set along with a clean California title in the seller’s name. The bike still wears factory paint, though the front fender has a few scratches and there is visible corrosion on some components. The bike has only been ridden by the seller, primarily on California’s Ortega and Pacific Coast Highways. The original mirrors, front turn signals, and an aluminum rack were removed for a cleaner look, though they are included in the sale. Always garaged, the seller states that this CBX has never been down and that the original paint is not faded. The fork lowers, rear shocks, and center stand exhibit some corrosion from years of coastal riding. The seller states that the seat is original with no tears or splits. The 1047cc DOHC inline-six made 105 hp when new and featured a 9,500 rpm redline. The engine has required only periodic servicing over the years and has never been rebuilt. The cam chain and drive chain have been adjusted routinely, but the carburetors have never needed tuning or synchronization. Cycle World Magazine recorded an 11.55 second quarter mile pass at 117.5 mph in 1978, along with a 140 mph top speed. The header pipes show some corrosion from years of heat cycling. The owner’s manual, factory service manual, and some period literature are included, though the rear turn signals and tool kit have been misplaced and are not. An extra set of used carburetors were purchased when the bike was moved to Arizona as the higher altitude was thought to require different jetting. The seller reports that the bike runs well on the factory settings, though the spare carbs will also be included with the sale.