No Reserve: 1956 MV Agusta CSTL

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This 1956 MV Agusta CSTL was purchased three years ago by the seller from a Southern California collector. Power is from a 175cc 4-stroke single with a 4-speed transmission. The most recent work is said to have included cleaning the engine case and reupholstering the seat as well as installing a new battery, chain, muffler, and front tire. This MV Agusta is sold with a clean California title in the seller’s name.

No Reserve: 1956 MV Agusta CSTL

The TL designation stood for “Touring Lusso” and featured a dual seat and fishtail muffler. The seat has been reupholstered, and the muffler replaced with an Emmevi item. Chrome Radaelli rims wear a newer tire up front and an older Pirelli in the rear.

No Reserve: 1956 MV Agusta CSTL

The fuel tank wears faded black and red paint and shows its age through assorted dings, corrosion, and paint loss. The decals are worn, and the seller notes that the gas cap seal leaks. A frame-mounted air pump is shown above. A walk-around video has been provided by the seller, with a second viewable below.

No Reserve: 1956 MV Agusta CSTL

The headlight shell contains the ignition and headlight switches as well as a 120-mph CEV speedometer. The odometer shows 208 miles, with total mileage unknown.

No Reserve: 1956 MV Agusta CSTL

The 172cc overhead-valve single was the first 4-stroke offered by MV Augusta and produced eight horsepower in stock form. A 4-speed transmission with a right-side rocker shift transfers power to the rear wheel via a chain drive. The most recent work reportedly included replacement of the battery and chain as well as cleaning the engine case, though no service records are available. A second walk-around video with the engine running is provided below.

No Reserve: 1972 Yamaha DT2 Enduro

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This 1972 Yamaha DT2 Enduro was refurbished and converted for off-road use by its previous owner, a vintage Yamaha collector in Dallas, Texas. Power is from a 250cc two-stroke single with a 5-speed transmission, and modifications include removal of the headlight and turn signals as well as the addition of a fork brace, aftermarket fender, and knobby tires. The bike has been displayed in the New England Motorcycle Museum for the last year and has been ridden less than 10 miles under current ownership. This DT2 is offered with a clean Vermont title in the seller’s name.

No Reserve: 1972 Yamaha DT2 Enduro

The fuel tank is finished in Pearl Yellow, while the fenders and side covers are satin black. The frame was also repainted and engine components were polished during reassembly. The seller notes that the paint on the tank shows orange peel and the forks show oxidation.

No Reserve: 1972 Yamaha DT2 Enduro

The bike was modified for off-road use through removal of the headlight, turn signals, gauges, battery box, and ignition switch. A fork brace, aftermarket front fender, and number plate were added. New old-stock Yamaha handlebars wear new grips and a period cross bar pad.

No Reserve: 1972 Yamaha DT2 Enduro

Wire-spoked wheels are mounted with knobby Dunlop tires, and a new chain and larger rear sprocket have been fitted. The tail light has also been replaced with a smaller aftermarket item.

No Reserve: 1972 Yamaha DT2 Enduro

The 250cc two-stroke single is paired with a 5-speed transmission and was reportedly rebuilt by the previous owner, though supporting records are unavailable. The following work was performed by the New England Motorcycle Museum last year according to the seller:

  • Oil injection pump timed and bled
  • Gear oil and air filter replaced
  • Clutch, control cables, and tire pressure adjusted
  • New spark plug added
  • Compression test performed with 125 psi reported

A video detailing the features and condition has been provided by the seller.

No Reserve: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

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This 1988 Ducati Paso 750 is finished in light metallic blue and shows 24k miles. It is powered by a 748cc L-twin paired with a 5-speed manual gearbox and comes equipped with a set of updated 750 Monster heads. Approximately 5k miles have added by the seller over the past two years, and the last cam belt change and valve adjustment were performed in 2018. This Paso is now being offered with a valve shim assortment and a clean Arizona title in the seller’s name.

No Reserve: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

The Paso features fully enclosed bodywork with dual oil coolers mounted on each side of the engine. Side mirrors and a solid windscreen are also integrated into the main fairing. This example is finished in light metallic blue with a black lower section. Paintwork has been performed in areas, and imperfections are visible in the finish, a few of which have been highlighted in the gallery below. Cracks are also visible in the black vinyl seat cover. 

No Reserve: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

The 16” factory wheels were manufactured by Oscam and come wrapped in a set of Shinko tires with a reported 3k miles of use. Braking is managed by triple Brembo discs.

 23,660 miles are shown on the odometer, approximately 5k of which have been added by the seller over the past two years. A cold-start video is shown above

No Reserve: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

The air/oil-cooled 748cc L-twin is paired with a 5-speed manual gearbox and has been updated with a set of 750 Monster cylinder heads. New cam belts were installed in 2018, at which point the valves were adjusted. An oil change has been performed within the past 2k miles. 

1959 BMW R50

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This 1959 BMW R50 is a refurbished example finished in black with creme pinstriping and equipped with a pair of Craven panniers. The seller purchased the bike from a dealer in 2011 and has added just a handful of miles over the past eight years. Power is provided by a numbers-matching 494cc flat-twin paired with a 4-speed gearbox, and this Earles-fork bike features a passenger pillion seat, rebuilt wheels, polished valve covers, and more as outlined in the listing below. This R50 received a first in class at the Rat’s Hole annual motorcycle show in Daytona Beach following the refurbishment and is now being offered with records and a clear Florida title in the seller’s name.

1959 BMW R50

The fuel tank and fenders have been refinished and pin-striped in the factory style. Close-ups of the frame, suspension, and hardware have been provided in the gallery below. Re-chromed rims are laced to the factory drum brake hubs with new stainless spokes and nipples.

1959 BMW R50

The bike is equipped with a solo saddle and “bread loaf” pillion seat from Denfeld, as well as a pair of matching period Craven hard case panniers.

1959 BMW R50

The headlight shell houses a single US-market speedometer, and 84k miles are shown on the 5-digit odometer.

1959 BMW R50

The 494cc OHV flat-twin has reportedly been rebuilt and comes paired with a 4-speed manual gearbox. For the past few years, the bike has been on display and a tune-up is recommended.

Preserved Exotic: 215-Mile 1973 Laverda 750 SF1

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This 1973 Laverda 750 SF1 is reportedly an unrestored survivor with just 215 original miles. The SF1 was one of Laverda’s esteemed SFC series machines, a name which stood for Super Freni Competizione (freni means brakes in Italian), referring to the gigantic leading shoe drums seen here in photos. Moto Laverda designed the bike with other impressive tech, including its 744cc ohc air-cooled parallel twin and race-bred suspension, setting a high standard for this generation of street-legal sport bikes. The SFs were real jewels in the legendary, now-defunct brand’s lineup, and preserved examples are now far and few between. Find this one here on eBay in Melbourne, Australia with a $28,500 AUD (~$20,230 USD) starting bid and no further reserve. According to the seller this bike has been affectionately watched over since new: “The bike belonged to a collector who kept it a warehouse along with 150 others and when he died another collector purchased it and kept it in his living room. The second owner turned the bike over every month to ensure it was kept in perfect condition.”  The seller also also adds that the bike is running well, and says that its only sign of use or age are a few small marks on the tank left behind by the first owner. Massimo Laverda is one of the key figures behind the SF line, and today his legacy is held in very high regards within the world of high-performance Italian bikes. Massimo always advocated for racing, and ensured that it would be a focal point of the company’s identity. This view was very much aligned with the mantra “win on Sunday, sell on Monday.” It worked too, for a time, with much of the company’s showroom success attributable to success on the track through the 1960’s and 70’s, though the encroaching dominance of the so-called UJM marked a slow decline from the 1980’s through to 2004 when the company was absorbed by Piaggio. This SF1 sounds to be unusually well preserved, but unfortunately only two so-so photos are provided in support of claims of originality and very limited use. Here’s what the musical 744cc twin should sound like, itself a detuned version of the motor that churned out endless wins for Laverda during the 1970’s.

No Reserve: 1981 Honda CB750C

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This 1981 Honda CB750 Custom was recently purchased by the selling dealer from the second owner, who had acquired it in 1991. The odometer now shows 23k miles, and power is from an air-cooled 748cc DOHC 4-cylinder mated to a 5-speed transmission. Work performed by the seller included rebuilding the carburetors with new fuel rail O-rings and air cutoff valves, as well as replacing the front brake master cylinder with a modern unit. This CB750 is now offered at no reserve with a clean Wisconsin title.

No Reserve: 1981 Honda CB750C

Finished in dual-tone Candy Universal Blue with Blue Metallic, this CB750 has been fitted with an upgraded front brake master cylinder. The emblem on the right side cover shows paint loss on the number “7.” The factory-applied chassis decals are peeling at the edges, and the center stand shows some corrosion.

No Reserve: 1981 Honda CB750C

The CB750C features an air-pressurized front suspension and dual front disc brakes. The Comstar alloy wheels wear Dunlop tires.

No Reserve: 1981 Honda CB750C

The instrument cluster features an 85-mph speedometer and a tachometer with a 9,500-rpm red line. Minor damage can be seen on the speedometer face, as the previous owner reportedly disassembled the gauge to remove a dead spider. Just over 23,500 miles are indicated on the odometer, about 25 of which were added by the seller.

No Reserve: 1981 Honda CB750C

The 16-valve 748cc DOHC 4-cylinder produced 77 horsepower in stock form and features four 30mm Keihin carburetors and a 4-into-4 exhaust. A 5-speed transmission transfers power to the rear wheel via chain drive. The selling dealer replaced the spark plugs and changed the oil. The carburetors were also rebuilt with new fuel rail O-rings and air cutoff valves before being synchronized. A walk-around video is attached below.

1980 Honda CBX 1000

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This 1980 Honda CBX 1000 is finished Candy Glory Red and powered by a 1,047cc DOHC inline-six paired with a 5-speed manual gearbox. The bike shows just 4,612 miles and has resided in the seller’s private collection for the past 7 years. It was Honda’s flagship bike is 1980, and factory equipment includes alloy Comstar wheels and triple disc brakes. A new battery was installed 3 months ago, at which point the oil was also changed. This CBX is being offered with the factory tool pouch, owner’s manual, a valve shim assortment, and a clean California title in the seller’s name.

1980 Honda CBX 1000

Two colors were available for the CBX in 1980, black or Candy Glory Red, and both feature a center black tank stripe and side covers. The factory graphics package includes pinstriping and Super Sport designations on the fuel tank.

1980 Honda CBX 1000

The CBX does not utilize a front downtube. Instead, the engine is stressed-member and hung from a double backbone. Braking is managed by triple discs, and the suspension includes a conventional front fork and twin shock swingarm. The 5-spoke Comstar wheels come wrapped in a set of older tires, and the seller recommends replacement before the bike is ridden any considerable distance.

1980 Honda CBX 1000

The instrument cluster houses a 10k rpm tachometer, voltage gauge, and a federally-mandated 85-mph speedometer. 4,612 miles are shown on the odometer, approximately 70 of which have been added by the seller over the past 7 years.

1980 Honda CBX 1000

The 1,047cc 24-valve double-overhead camshaft inline-six was inspired by Honda’s RC-series race bikes from the 1960s. To keep the inline-six cylinder engine narrow, the primary drive is located at the center of the crankshaft, and the alternator is mounted inboard behind the cylinders and crankcase. Induction is through six inward-angled 28mm carburetors, and the factory 3-1 dual exhaust system remains installed.

1980 Honda CBX 1000

The owner’s manual, factory tool pouch, and an assortment of valve adjustment shims are included with the sale.

No Reserve: 1984 Honda Trail 110

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This 1984 Honda Trail 110 is powered by a 4-stroke 105cc single paired with a dual-range 4-speed semi-automatic transmission and was acquired by the seller from a Honda collector three months ago. Subsequent service reportedly included changes of the engine and fork oil. This Trail 110 is offered at no reserve with a factory tool roll, an owner’s manual, and a clean New Hampshire title in the owner’s name.

No Reserve: 1984 Honda Trail 110

The frame and side covers are finished in Monza Red with factory-style decals. Features include crash bars, a skid plate, and a rear parcel rack, the latter of which is fitted with an optional passenger seat. No rear foot pegs are provided. The seller notes pitting on the underside of the rack and skid plate as well as minor corrosion on the front fender and engine case. Wire-spoke 17″ wheels wear newer Golden Boy trail tires.

No Reserve: 1984 Honda Trail 110

The 60-mph speedometer contains warning lights for neutral, high beams, and turn signals. The 5-digit odometer shows 728 miles, just five of which have been added by the seller.

No Reserve: 1984 Honda Trail 110

The fuel tank holds approximately 1.5 gallons, and an auxiliary .6-gallon fuel can is mounted to the left side.

No Reserve: 1984 Honda Trail 110

The 105cc SOHC 4-stroke single produced 7.5 horsepower when new and is paired with a dual-range 4-speed transmission with a rocker shift. The clutch cover has been re-painted and all screws replaced with Allen head bolts. The seller changed the engine and fork oil in December, and the bike recently passed a New Hampshire state inspection. Previous service records are unavailable.

No Reserve: 1984 Honda Trail 110

A factory-supplied tool roll, owner’s manual, and all of the replaced case screws will be included in the sale.

No Reserve: 1980 Honda CB650C

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This 1980 Honda CB650C is a Custom model powered by a 627cc SOHC 4-cylinder paired with a 5-speed transmission. The bike was purchased by the selling dealer two months ago, and maintenance under their care consisted of a carburetor rebuild, valve adjustment, oil change, and more. The fuel tank was repainted by a previous owner, and other parts installed by the seller include a 4-into-1 exhaust and an H4 headlight and bucket. This CB650 shows 19k miles and is offered by the selling dealer in Wisconsin at no reserve with a clean Illinois title.

No Reserve: 1980 Honda CB650C

The CB650 was offered in standard and Custom trim levels, the latter equipped with extended forks, a 3.6-gallon teardrop tank, pull-back bars, chrome air box, and Comstar wheels. The 19″ front wheel features a single-caliper disc brake, while the 16″ rear wheel has a drum. An upgraded H4 headlight is fitted, and the factory center stand has been removed. A new Shinko tire has been mounted to the front wheel, and the rear tire is reported to have 90% tread remaining.

No Reserve: 1980 Honda CB650C

The fuel tank was repainted by the previous owner in a metallic shade of blue, and the seller notes a flaw in the clear coat that can be seen in some lighting conditions.

No Reserve: 1980 Honda CB650C

Instrumentation consists of a federally-mandated, 85-mph speedometer and a tachometer with a 9,500-rpm redline. The speedometer cable was recently replaced, and the odometer currently shows just over 19k miles.

No Reserve: 1980 Honda CB650C

Derived from the CB550 engine, the 627cc SOHC 4-cylinder was factory rated at 63 horsepower and features four 26mm Keihin carburetors. A 5-speed transmission transfers power to the rear wheel via chain drive. The seller added a Mac 4-into-1 exhaust, a new battery, and spark plugs. The valves were also adjusted, the oil was changed, and the carburetors were rebuilt with new air cutoff valves and fuel-rail O-rings. The seller notes that the chain shows wear and should be replaced soon.

No Reserve: 35-Years-Owned 1951 Ariel Square Four

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This 1951 Ariel Square Four Mark 1 is powered by a 997cc OHV 4-cylinder engine paired with a 4-speed gearbox. The seller purchased the bike in 1984 from Bol d’Or Motorcycles in Sussex, England and has added approximately 1,000 miles over the past 35 years. A refurbishment was reportedly performed in the early 1980s, and work during the seller’s ownership included repainting and coating the fuel tank, as well as servicing the ignition system. This Square Four is now being offered at no reserve with a clear Kansas title.

No Reserve: 35-Years-Owned 1951 Ariel Square Four

Ariel produced the Square Four in various iterations between 1931 and 1959. This example comes from the 3rd year of Mark 1 production and features a refinished and internally-coated chrome fuel tank over a gloss black frame and fenders. A “pedestrian slicer” front and matching rear license plate remain installed from the bike’s time in England, prior to the seller’s acquisition.

No Reserve: 35-Years-Owned 1951 Ariel Square Four

A conventional telescopic fork is utilized up front, and the chrome rims are laced to twin-shoe front and rear drum brakes. New tires are recommended before the bike is ridden any considerable distance.

No Reserve: 35-Years-Owned 1951 Ariel Square Four

Ariel introduced the Antsey-link rear suspension as an option for the Square Four in 1939. It was a patented system, developed as a solution to overcome issues inherent with a traditional plunger-type rear suspension, and incorporates a link that travels through a short arc ensuring the drive chain tension is kept constant.

No Reserve: 35-Years-Owned 1951 Ariel Square Four

Charging is managed by a Lucas generator, and an ammeter is mounted just above the 120-mph Smiths speedometer. A third gauge is located on the fuel tank and monitors engine oil pressure. 28k miles are shown on the odometer, approximately 1,000 of which have been added by the seller over the past 35 years.

No Reserve: 35-Years-Owned 1951 Ariel Square Four

The 4-cylinder engine in the Square Four was developed by Edward Turner in 1928 and saw multiple revisions before production ceased in 1959. To achieve a size slightly larger than a conventional British twin, it utilizes two crankshafts running in parallel within a common crankcase. Displacement for the Mark 1 was 997cc, and each of the four pistons share a common aluminum cylinder block and OHV head. Induction is through a single carburetor, and the exhaust ports are paired up on either side. A new ignition coil, contact breaker, spark plugs, and fuel filter have recently been installed, and a small dent is noted on the clutch cover.